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The Very Hungry Caterpillar: 50 years of magical reading for children

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E ric Carle ’s decision to turn over a new leaf and exchange working as an art director on Madison Avenue for a career creating picture books was a transformation worthy of any caterpillar turned butterfly.
Carle was about to reach 40 when he switched his life up and within a short time he had published The Very Hungry Caterpillar . Although it’s only 224 words long, this enchanting story went on to sell more than 50 million copies, be translated into 62 languages and was once voted the best children’s bedtime story ever, in a World Book Day survey. A copy of The Very Hungry Caterpillar , which was released by The World Publishing Company on 3 June 1969, is bought by someone in the world nearly every 50 seconds. “The storyline is surprisingly universal,” says Carle, who turns 90 this month.
Carle had the rare ability to see the world through the eyes of a child when he had grown into an adult and it is the source of much of the power of The Very Hungry Caterpillar . We’ll tell you what’s true. You can form your own view.
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It is a simple, beautiful and heart-warming tale of change and growth: a caterpillar eating through so many different foods, through the week, before turning into a gorgeous butterfly. Even in a digital age, the pictures and lyrical story continue to readily engage children’s attention.
Carle’s own love of nature was instilled as a child, albeit during a traumatic time following his family’s move from Syracuse, in New York state, back to Stuttgart, in his parents’ native Germany. He was six when he left America in 1939 and his time in Germany left indelible mental scars. He hated his strict German grammar school, where students were disciplined with bamboo sticks and ordered to worship the Nazi leadership. Even in his eighties, Carle recalls the burning welts left on his hands after beatings.
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Created with Sketch. 1/40 Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
It is a fact universally acknowledged that every list of great books must include Pride and Prejudice. Don’t be fooled by the bonnets and balls: beneath the sugary surface is a tart exposé of the marriage market in Georgian England. For every lucky Elizabeth, who tames the haughty, handsome Mr. Darcy and learns to know herself in the process, there’s a Charlotte, resigned to life with a driveling buffoon for want of a pretty face. 2/40 The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13 ¾, Sue Townsend
Read this one when you’re decrepit enough, and chances are you’ll die laughing. No-one has lampooned the self-absorption, delusions of grandeur and sexual frustration of adolescence as brilliantly as Susan Townsend, and no one ever will. Beyond the majestically majestic poetry and the pimples, there’s also a sharp satire of Thatcherist Britain. 3/40 Catch 22, Joseph Heller
It’s not often an idiom coined in a novel becomes a catch-phrase, but Joseph Heller managed it with his madcap, savage and hilarious tour de force. War is the ultimate dead-end for logic, and this novel explores all its absurdities as we follow US bombardier pilot Captain John Yossarian. While Heller drew on his own experience as a WWII pilot, it was the McCarthyism of the fifties that fueled the book’s glorious rage. 4/40 Tess of the d’Urbervilles, Thomas Hardy
A good 125 years before #metoo, Thomas Hardy skewered the sexual hypocrisy of the Victorian age in this melodramatic but immensely moving novel. Tess is a naïve girl from a poor family who is raped by a wealthy land-owner. After the death of her baby, she tries to build a new life, but the “shame” of her past casts a long shadow. Read this if you want to understand the rotten culture at the root of victim-blaming. 5/40 Things fall apart, Chinua Achebe
A classic exposé of colonialism, Achebe’s novel explores what happens to a Nigerian village when European missionaries arrive. The main character, warrior-like Okonkwo, embodies the traditional values that are ultimately doomed. By the time Achebe was born in 1930, missionaries had been settled in his village for decades. He wrote in English and took the title of his novel from a Yeats poem, but wove Igbo proverbs throughout this lyrical work. 6/40 1984, George Orwell
The ultimate piece of dystopian fiction, 1984 was so prescient that it’s become a cliché. But forget TV’s Big Brother or the trite travesty of Room 101: the original has lost none of its furious force. Orwell was interested in the mechanics of totalitarianism, imagining a society that took the paranoid surveillance of the Soviets to chilling conclusions. Our hero, Winston, tries to resist a grey world where a screen watches your every move, but bravery is ultimately futile when the state worms its way inside your mind. 7/40 To kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
A timeless plea for justice in the setting of America’s racist South during the depression years, Lee’s novel caused a sensation. Her device was simple but incendiary: look at the world through the eyes of a six-year-old, in this case, Jean Louise Finch, whose father is a lawyer defending a black man falsely accused of raping a white woman. Lee hoped for nothing but “a quick and merciful death at the hands of the reviewers”: she won the Pulitzer and a place on the curriculum. 8/40 Great Expectations, Charles Dickens
Dickens was the social conscience of the Victorian age, but don’t let that put you off. Great Expectations is the roiling tale of the orphaned Pip, the lovely Estella, and the thwarted Miss Havisham. First written in serial form, you barely have time to recover from one cliffhanger before the next one beckons, all told in Dickens’ luxuriant, humorous, heartfelt prose. 9/40 The God of Small Things, Arundhati Roy
Roy won the 1997 Booker Prize with her debut novel, a powerful intergenerational tale of love that crosses caste lines in southern India, and the appalling consequences for those who break the taboos dictating “who should be loved, and how. And how much”. Sex, death, religion, the ambivalent pull of motherhood: it’s all there in this beautiful and haunting book. 10/40 Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel
In an astonishing act of literary ventriloquism, Mantel inhabits a fictionalised version of Thomas Cromwell, a working-class boy who rose through his own fierce intelligence to be a key player in the treacherous world of Tudor politics. Historical fiction so immersive you can smell the fear and ambition. 11/40 The Code of the Woosters, PG Wodehouse
If you haven’t read PG Wodehouse in a hot bath with a snifter of whisky and ideally a rubber duck for company, you haven’t lived. Wallow in this sublimely silly tale of the ultimate comic double act: bumbling aristocrat Bertie Wooster and his omniscient butler, Jeeves. A sheer joy to read that also manages to satirise British fascist leader Oswald Mosley as a querulous grump in black shorts. 12/40 Frankenstein, Mary Shelley
Shelley was just 18 when she wrote Frankenstein as part of a challenge with her future husband, Percy Shelley, and Lord Byron, to concoct the best horror story. Put down the green face paint: Frankenstein’s monster is a complex creation who yearns for sympathy and companionship. Some 200 years after it was first published, the gothic tale feels more relevant than ever as genetic science pushes the boundaries of what it means to create life. 13/40 Lord of the Flies, William Golding
Anyone who has ever suspected that children are primitive little beasties will nod sagely as they read Golding’s classic. His theory is this: maroon a bunch of schoolboys on an island, and watch how quickly the trappings of decent behaviour fall away. Never has a broken pair of spectacles seemed so sinister, or civilisation so fragile. 14/40 Midnight’s Children, Salman Rushdie
The protagonist of Rushdie’s most celebrated novel is born at the exact moment India gains independence. He’s also born with superpowers, and he’s not the only one. In an audacious and poetic piece of magical realism, Rushdie tells the story of India’s blood-soaked resurgence via a swathe of children born at midnight with uncanny abilities. 15/40 Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte
You will need a cold, dead heart not to be moved by one of literature’s steeliest heroines. From the institutional cruelty of her boarding school, the “small, plain” Jane Eyre becomes a governess who demands a right to think and feel. Not many love stories take in a mad woman in the attic and a spot of therapeutic disfigurement, but this one somehow carries it off with mythic aplomb 16/40 Middlemarch, George Eliot
This is a richly satisfying slow burn of a novel that follows the lives and loves of the inhabitants of a small town in England through the years 1829–32. The acerbic wit and timeless truth of its observations mark this out as a work of genius; but at the time the author, Mary Anne Evans, had to turn to a male pen name to be taken seriously. 17/40 Secret History, Donna Tartt
Stick another log on the fire and curl up with this dark, peculiar and quite brilliant literary murder tale. A group of classics students become entranced by Greek mythology – and then take it up a level. Remember, kids: never try your own delirious Dionysian ritual at home. 18/40 Americanah, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
A subtle and engrossing look at racial identity, through the story of a charismatic young Nigerian woman who leaves her comfortable Lagos home for a world of struggles in the United States. Capturing both the hard-scrabble life of US immigrants and the brash divisions of a rising Nigeria, Adichie crosses continents with all her usual depth of feeling and lightness of touch. 19/40 Cold Comfort Farm, Stella Gibbons
An absolute unadulterated comic joy of a novel. Stella Gibbons neatly pokes fun at sentimental navel-gazing with her zesty heroine Flora, who is more interested in basic hygiene than histrionics. In other words, if you’ve “seen something nasty in the woodshed,” just shut the door. 20/40 Beloved, Toni Morrison
Dedicated to the “Sixty Million and more” Africans and their descendants who died as a result of the slave trade, this is a cultural milestone and a Pulitzer-winning tour de force. Morrison was inspired by the real-life story of an enslaved woman who killed her own daughter rather than see her return to slavery. In her plot, the murdered child returns to haunt a black community, suggesting the inescapable taint of America’s history. 21/40 Brideshead Revisited, Evelyn Waugh
Evelyn Waugh bottles the intoxicating vapour of a vanished era in this novel about middle-class Charles Ryder, who meets upper-class Sebastian Flyte at Oxford University in the 1920s. Scrap the wartime prologue, and Charles’s entire relationship with Sebastian’s sister Julia (Dear Evelyn, thank you for your latest manuscript, a few suggested cuts…) and you’re looking at one of the most affecting love affairs in the English language. 22/40 Dune, Frank Herbert
You can almost feel your mouth dry with thirst as you enter the world of Frank Herbert’s Dune and encounter the desert planet of Arrakis, with its giant sandworms and mind-altering spice. It’s the setting for an epic saga of warring feudal houses, but it’s as much eco-parable as thrilling adventure story. Rarely has a fictional world been so completely realised. 23/40 Wuthering Heights, Emily Bronte
Will there ever be a novel that burns with more passionate intensity than Wuthering Heights? The forces that bring together its fierce heroine Catherine Earnshaw and cruel hero Heathcliff are violent and untameable, yet rooted in a childhood devotion to one another, when Heathcliff obeyed Cathy’s every command. It’s impossible to imagine this novel ever provoking quiet slumbers; Emily Bronte’s vision of nature blazes with poetry. 24/40 The Great Gatsby, F Scott Fitzgerald
The savage reviews that greeted F Scott Fitzgerald’s third novel – “no more than a glorified anecdote”; “for the season only” – failed to recognise something truly great; a near-perfect distillation of the hope, ambition, cynicism and desire at the heart of the American Dream. Other novels capture the allure of the invented self, from Stendhal’s The Red and the Black to Thomas Mann’s Confessions of Felix Krull, but Fitzgerald’s enigmatic Jay Gatsby casts a shadow that reaches to Mad Men’s Don Draper and beyond. 25/40 A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess
From the moment we meet Alex and his three droogs in the Korova milkbar, drinking moloko with vellocet or synthemesc and wondering whether to chat up the devotchkas at the counter or tolchock some old veck in an alley, it’s clear that normal novelistic conventions do not apply. Anthony Burgess’s slim volume about a violent near-future where aversion therapy is used on feral youth who speak Nadsat and commit rape and murder, is a dystopian masterpiece. 26/40 Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov
Banned from entering the UK in its year of publication, 1955, Vladimir Nabokov’s astonishingly skilful and enduringly controversial work of fiction introduces us to literary professor and self-confessed hebephile Humbert Humbert, the perhaps unreliable narrator of the novel. He marries widow Charlotte Haze only to get access to her daughter, 12-year-old Dolores, nicknamed Lo by her mother, or as Humbert calls her “Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul.” Cloaking his abuse in the allusive language of idealised love does not lessen Humbert’s crimes, but allows Nabokov to skewer him where he hides. 27/40 Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, Philip K Dick
Here be Roy Baty, Rick Deckard and Rachael Rosen – the novel that inspired Blade Runner is stranger even than the film it became. Back in an age before artificial intelligence could teach itself to play chess in a few hours better than any grandmaster that ever lived, Philip K Dick was using the concept of android life to explore what it meant to be human, and what it is to be left behind on a compromised planet. That he could do it in 250 pages that set the mind spinning and engage the emotions with every page-turn make this a rare science-fiction indeed. 28/40 Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad
Inspired by Conrad’s own experiences of captaining a trading steamer up the Congo River, Heart of Darkness is part adventure, part psychological voyage into the unknown, as the narrator Marlow relays the story of his journey into the jungle to meet the mysterious ivory trader Mr Kurtz. Although debate continues to rage about whether the novel and its attitude to Africa and colonialism is racist, it’s deeply involving and demands to be read. 29/40 Dracula, Bram Stoker
Whatever passed between Irish theatre manager Bram Stoker and the Hungarian traveller and writer Ármin Vámbéry when they met in London and talked of the Carpathian Mountains, it incubated in the Gothic imagination of Stoker into a work that has had an incalculable influence on Western culture. It’s not hard to read the Count as a shadowy sexual figure surprising straitlaced Victorian England in their beds, but in Stoker’s hands he’s also bloody creepy. 30/40 The Catcher in the Rye, J D Salinger
It only takes one sentence, written in the first person, for Salinger’s Holden Caulfield to announce himself in all his teenage nihilism, sneering at you for wanting to know his biographical details “and all that David Copperfield kind of crap”. The Catcher in the Rye is the quintessential novel of the adolescent experience, captured in deathless prose. 31/40 The Big Sleep, Raymond Chandler
Dashiel Hammett may have been harder boiled, his plots more intricate but, wow, does Raymond Chandler have style. The push and pull at the start of The Big Sleep between private detective Philip Marlowe, in his powder-blue suit and dark blue shirt, and Miss Carmen Sternwood, with her “little sharp predatory teeth” and lashes that she lowers and raises like a theatre curtain, sets the tone for a story of bad girls and bad men. 32/40 Vanity Fair, William Makepeace Thackeray
All the teeming life of 19th century London is here in Thackeray’s masterpiece, right down to the curry houses frequented by Jos Sedley, who has gained a taste for the hot stuff as an officer in the East India Trading Company. But it is Becky Sharp, one of literature’s great characters, who gives this novel its enduring fascination. As a woman on the make, Becky is the perfect blend of wit, cunning and cold-hearted ruthlessness. Try as film and TV might to humanise and make excuses for her, Becky needs victims to thrive! And she’s all the more compelling for that. 33/40 The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath
The only novel written by the poet Sylvia Plath is a semi-autobiographical account of a descent into depression that the book’s narrator Esther Greenwood describes as like being trapped under a bell jar – used to create a vacuum in scientific experiments – struggling to breathe. Almost every word is arresting, and the way that Plath captures the vivid life happening around Esther, news events, magazine parties, accentuates the deadening illness that drives her towards suicidal feelings. Plath herself would commit suicide one month after the novel’s publication in 1963. 34/40 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Roald Dahl
Harry Potter may be more popular, but Willy Wonka is altogether weirder. From the overwhelming poverty experienced by Charlie Bucket and his family, to the spoilt, greedy, brattish children who join Charlie on his trip to Willy Wonka’s phantasmagorical sweet factory there is nothing artificially sweetened in Roald Dahl’s startling work of fantasy. 35/40 Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy
Andrew Davies’s recent TV adaptation of War and Peace reminded those of us who can’t quite face returning to the novel’s monstrous demands just how brilliantly Tolstoy delineates affairs of the heart, even if the war passages will always be a struggle. In Anna Karenina – enormous, too! –the great Russian novelist captures the erotic charge between the married Anna and the bachelor Vronsky, then drags his heroine through society’s scorn as their affair takes shape, without ever suggesting we move from her side. 36/40 Dangerous Liaisons, Pierre Choderlos de Laclos
The most deliciously wicked experience in literature, this epistolary novel introduces us to the Marquise de Merteuil and Vicomte de Valmont, who play cruel games of sexual conquest on their unwitting victims. The Marquise’s justification for her behaviour – “I, who was born to revenge my sex and master yours” – will strike a chord in the #metoo era, but emotions, even love, intrude, to the point where Laclos’s amorality becomes untenable. Sexy but very, very bad. 37/40 100 Years of Solitude, Gabriel Garcia Marquez
The energy and enchantment of Garcia Marquez’s story of seven generations of the Buendia family in a small town in Colombia continue to enthrall half a century on. Hauntings and premonitions allied to a journalistic eye for detail and a poetic sensibility make Marquez’s magical realism unique. 38/40 The Trial, Frank Kafka
“Someone must have been telling lies about Josef K…” So begins Kafka’s nightmarish tale of a man trapped in an unfathomable bureaucratic process after being arrested by two agents from an unidentified office for a crime they’re not allowed to tell him about. Foreshadowing the antisemitism of Nazi-occupied Europe, as well as the methods of the Stasi, KGB, and StB, it’s an unsettling, at times bewildering, tale with chilling resonance. 39/40 Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier
The second Mrs de Winter is the narrator of Du Maurier’s marvellously gothic tale about a young woman who replaces the deceased Rebecca as wife to the wealthy Maxim de Winter and mistress of the Manderley estate. There she meets the housekeeper Mrs Danvers, formerly devoted to Rebecca, who proceeds to torment her. As atmospheric, psychological horror it just gets darker and darker. 40/40 The Leopard, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa
Published posthumously in 1958, Tomasi di Lampedusa’s novel is set in 19th century Sicily, where revolution is in the air. The imposing Prince Don Fabrizio presides over a town close to Palermo during the last days of an old world in which class stratifications are stable and understood. Garibaldi’s forces have taken the island and a new world will follow. It’s a deep and poetic meditation on political change and the characters that it produces. 1/40 Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
It is a fact universally acknowledged that every list of great books must include Pride and Prejudice. Don’t be fooled by the bonnets and balls: beneath the sugary surface is a tart exposé of the marriage market in Georgian England. For every lucky Elizabeth, who tames the haughty, handsome Mr. Darcy and learns to know herself in the process, there’s a Charlotte, resigned to life with a driveling buffoon for want of a pretty face. 2/40 The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13 ¾, Sue Townsend
Read this one when you’re decrepit enough, and chances are you’ll die laughing. No-one has lampooned the self-absorption, delusions of grandeur and sexual frustration of adolescence as brilliantly as Susan Townsend, and no one ever will. Beyond the majestically majestic poetry and the pimples, there’s also a sharp satire of Thatcherist Britain. 3/40 Catch 22, Joseph Heller
It’s not often an idiom coined in a novel becomes a catch-phrase, but Joseph Heller managed it with his madcap, savage and hilarious tour de force. War is the ultimate dead-end for logic, and this novel explores all its absurdities as we follow US bombardier pilot Captain John Yossarian. While Heller drew on his own experience as a WWII pilot, it was the McCarthyism of the fifties that fueled the book’s glorious rage. 4/40 Tess of the d’Urbervilles, Thomas Hardy
A good 125 years before #metoo, Thomas Hardy skewered the sexual hypocrisy of the Victorian age in this melodramatic but immensely moving novel. Tess is a naïve girl from a poor family who is raped by a wealthy land-owner. After the death of her baby, she tries to build a new life, but the “shame” of her past casts a long shadow. Read this if you want to understand the rotten culture at the root of victim-blaming. 5/40 Things fall apart, Chinua Achebe
A classic exposé of colonialism, Achebe’s novel explores what happens to a Nigerian village when European missionaries arrive. The main character, warrior-like Okonkwo, embodies the traditional values that are ultimately doomed. By the time Achebe was born in 1930, missionaries had been settled in his village for decades. He wrote in English and took the title of his novel from a Yeats poem, but wove Igbo proverbs throughout this lyrical work. 6/40 1984, George Orwell
The ultimate piece of dystopian fiction, 1984 was so prescient that it’s become a cliché. But forget TV’s Big Brother or the trite travesty of Room 101: the original has lost none of its furious force. Orwell was interested in the mechanics of totalitarianism, imagining a society that took the paranoid surveillance of the Soviets to chilling conclusions. Our hero, Winston, tries to resist a grey world where a screen watches your every move, but bravery is ultimately futile when the state worms its way inside your mind. 7/40 To kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
A timeless plea for justice in the setting of America’s racist South during the depression years, Lee’s novel caused a sensation. Her device was simple but incendiary: look at the world through the eyes of a six-year-old, in this case, Jean Louise Finch, whose father is a lawyer defending a black man falsely accused of raping a white woman. Lee hoped for nothing but “a quick and merciful death at the hands of the reviewers”: she won the Pulitzer and a place on the curriculum. 8/40 Great Expectations, Charles Dickens
Dickens was the social conscience of the Victorian age, but don’t let that put you off. Great Expectations is the roiling tale of the orphaned Pip, the lovely Estella, and the thwarted Miss Havisham. First written in serial form, you barely have time to recover from one cliffhanger before the next one beckons, all told in Dickens’ luxuriant, humorous, heartfelt prose. 9/40 The God of Small Things, Arundhati Roy
Roy won the 1997 Booker Prize with her debut novel, a powerful intergenerational tale of love that crosses caste lines in southern India, and the appalling consequences for those who break the taboos dictating “who should be loved, and how. And how much”. Sex, death, religion, the ambivalent pull of motherhood: it’s all there in this beautiful and haunting book. 10/40 Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel
In an astonishing act of literary ventriloquism, Mantel inhabits a fictionalised version of Thomas Cromwell, a working-class boy who rose through his own fierce intelligence to be a key player in the treacherous world of Tudor politics. Historical fiction so immersive you can smell the fear and ambition. 11/40 The Code of the Woosters, PG Wodehouse
If you haven’t read PG Wodehouse in a hot bath with a snifter of whisky and ideally a rubber duck for company, you haven’t lived. Wallow in this sublimely silly tale of the ultimate comic double act: bumbling aristocrat Bertie Wooster and his omniscient butler, Jeeves. A sheer joy to read that also manages to satirise British fascist leader Oswald Mosley as a querulous grump in black shorts. 12/40 Frankenstein, Mary Shelley
Shelley was just 18 when she wrote Frankenstein as part of a challenge with her future husband, Percy Shelley, and Lord Byron, to concoct the best horror story. Put down the green face paint: Frankenstein’s monster is a complex creation who yearns for sympathy and companionship. Some 200 years after it was first published, the gothic tale feels more relevant than ever as genetic science pushes the boundaries of what it means to create life. 13/40 Lord of the Flies, William Golding
Anyone who has ever suspected that children are primitive little beasties will nod sagely as they read Golding’s classic. His theory is this: maroon a bunch of schoolboys on an island, and watch how quickly the trappings of decent behaviour fall away. Never has a broken pair of spectacles seemed so sinister, or civilisation so fragile. 14/40 Midnight’s Children, Salman Rushdie
The protagonist of Rushdie’s most celebrated novel is born at the exact moment India gains independence. He’s also born with superpowers, and he’s not the only one. In an audacious and poetic piece of magical realism, Rushdie tells the story of India’s blood-soaked resurgence via a swathe of children born at midnight with uncanny abilities. 15/40 Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte
You will need a cold, dead heart not to be moved by one of literature’s steeliest heroines. From the institutional cruelty of her boarding school, the “small, plain” Jane Eyre becomes a governess who demands a right to think and feel. Not many love stories take in a mad woman in the attic and a spot of therapeutic disfigurement, but this one somehow carries it off with mythic aplomb 16/40 Middlemarch, George Eliot
This is a richly satisfying slow burn of a novel that follows the lives and loves of the inhabitants of a small town in England through the years 1829–32. The acerbic wit and timeless truth of its observations mark this out as a work of genius; but at the time the author, Mary Anne Evans, had to turn to a male pen name to be taken seriously. 17/40 Secret History, Donna Tartt
Stick another log on the fire and curl up with this dark, peculiar and quite brilliant literary murder tale. A group of classics students become entranced by Greek mythology – and then take it up a level. Remember, kids: never try your own delirious Dionysian ritual at home. 18/40 Americanah, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
A subtle and engrossing look at racial identity, through the story of a charismatic young Nigerian woman who leaves her comfortable Lagos home for a world of struggles in the United States. Capturing both the hard-scrabble life of US immigrants and the brash divisions of a rising Nigeria, Adichie crosses continents with all her usual depth of feeling and lightness of touch. 19/40 Cold Comfort Farm, Stella Gibbons
An absolute unadulterated comic joy of a novel. Stella Gibbons neatly pokes fun at sentimental navel-gazing with her zesty heroine Flora, who is more interested in basic hygiene than histrionics. In other words, if you’ve “seen something nasty in the woodshed,” just shut the door. 20/40 Beloved, Toni Morrison
Dedicated to the “Sixty Million and more” Africans and their descendants who died as a result of the slave trade, this is a cultural milestone and a Pulitzer-winning tour de force. Morrison was inspired by the real-life story of an enslaved woman who killed her own daughter rather than see her return to slavery. In her plot, the murdered child returns to haunt a black community, suggesting the inescapable taint of America’s history. 21/40 Brideshead Revisited, Evelyn Waugh
Evelyn Waugh bottles the intoxicating vapour of a vanished era in this novel about middle-class Charles Ryder, who meets upper-class Sebastian Flyte at Oxford University in the 1920s. Scrap the wartime prologue, and Charles’s entire relationship with Sebastian’s sister Julia (Dear Evelyn, thank you for your latest manuscript, a few suggested cuts…) and you’re looking at one of the most affecting love affairs in the English language. 22/40 Dune, Frank Herbert
You can almost feel your mouth dry with thirst as you enter the world of Frank Herbert’s Dune and encounter the desert planet of Arrakis, with its giant sandworms and mind-altering spice. It’s the setting for an epic saga of warring feudal houses, but it’s as much eco-parable as thrilling adventure story. Rarely has a fictional world been so completely realised. 23/40 Wuthering Heights, Emily Bronte
Will there ever be a novel that burns with more passionate intensity than Wuthering Heights? The forces that bring together its fierce heroine Catherine Earnshaw and cruel hero Heathcliff are violent and untameable, yet rooted in a childhood devotion to one another, when Heathcliff obeyed Cathy’s every command. It’s impossible to imagine this novel ever provoking quiet slumbers; Emily Bronte’s vision of nature blazes with poetry. 24/40 The Great Gatsby, F Scott Fitzgerald
The savage reviews that greeted F Scott Fitzgerald’s third novel – “no more than a glorified anecdote”; “for the season only” – failed to recognise something truly great; a near-perfect distillation of the hope, ambition, cynicism and desire at the heart of the American Dream. Other novels capture the allure of the invented self, from Stendhal’s The Red and the Black to Thomas Mann’s Confessions of Felix Krull, but Fitzgerald’s enigmatic Jay Gatsby casts a shadow that reaches to Mad Men’s Don Draper and beyond. 25/40 A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess
From the moment we meet Alex and his three droogs in the Korova milkbar, drinking moloko with vellocet or synthemesc and wondering whether to chat up the devotchkas at the counter or tolchock some old veck in an alley, it’s clear that normal novelistic conventions do not apply. Anthony Burgess’s slim volume about a violent near-future where aversion therapy is used on feral youth who speak Nadsat and commit rape and murder, is a dystopian masterpiece. 26/40 Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov
Banned from entering the UK in its year of publication, 1955, Vladimir Nabokov’s astonishingly skilful and enduringly controversial work of fiction introduces us to literary professor and self-confessed hebephile Humbert Humbert, the perhaps unreliable narrator of the novel. He marries widow Charlotte Haze only to get access to her daughter, 12-year-old Dolores, nicknamed Lo by her mother, or as Humbert calls her “Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul.” Cloaking his abuse in the allusive language of idealised love does not lessen Humbert’s crimes, but allows Nabokov to skewer him where he hides. 27/40 Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, Philip K Dick
Here be Roy Baty, Rick Deckard and Rachael Rosen – the novel that inspired Blade Runner is stranger even than the film it became. Back in an age before artificial intelligence could teach itself to play chess in a few hours better than any grandmaster that ever lived, Philip K Dick was using the concept of android life to explore what it meant to be human, and what it is to be left behind on a compromised planet. That he could do it in 250 pages that set the mind spinning and engage the emotions with every page-turn make this a rare science-fiction indeed. 28/40 Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad
Inspired by Conrad’s own experiences of captaining a trading steamer up the Congo River, Heart of Darkness is part adventure, part psychological voyage into the unknown, as the narrator Marlow relays the story of his journey into the jungle to meet the mysterious ivory trader Mr Kurtz. Although debate continues to rage about whether the novel and its attitude to Africa and colonialism is racist, it’s deeply involving and demands to be read. 29/40 Dracula, Bram Stoker
Whatever passed between Irish theatre manager Bram Stoker and the Hungarian traveller and writer Ármin Vámbéry when they met in London and talked of the Carpathian Mountains, it incubated in the Gothic imagination of Stoker into a work that has had an incalculable influence on Western culture. It’s not hard to read the Count as a shadowy sexual figure surprising straitlaced Victorian England in their beds, but in Stoker’s hands he’s also bloody creepy. 30/40 The Catcher in the Rye, J D Salinger
It only takes one sentence, written in the first person, for Salinger’s Holden Caulfield to announce himself in all his teenage nihilism, sneering at you for wanting to know his biographical details “and all that David Copperfield kind of crap”. The Catcher in the Rye is the quintessential novel of the adolescent experience, captured in deathless prose. 31/40 The Big Sleep, Raymond Chandler
Dashiel Hammett may have been harder boiled, his plots more intricate but, wow, does Raymond Chandler have style. The push and pull at the start of The Big Sleep between private detective Philip Marlowe, in his powder-blue suit and dark blue shirt, and Miss Carmen Sternwood, with her “little sharp predatory teeth” and lashes that she lowers and raises like a theatre curtain, sets the tone for a story of bad girls and bad men. 32/40 Vanity Fair, William Makepeace Thackeray
All the teeming life of 19th century London is here in Thackeray’s masterpiece, right down to the curry houses frequented by Jos Sedley, who has gained a taste for the hot stuff as an officer in the East India Trading Company. But it is Becky Sharp, one of literature’s great characters, who gives this novel its enduring fascination. As a woman on the make, Becky is the perfect blend of wit, cunning and cold-hearted ruthlessness. Try as film and TV might to humanise and make excuses for her, Becky needs victims to thrive! And she’s all the more compelling for that. 33/40 The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath
The only novel written by the poet Sylvia Plath is a semi-autobiographical account of a descent into depression that the book’s narrator Esther Greenwood describes as like being trapped under a bell jar – used to create a vacuum in scientific experiments – struggling to breathe. Almost every word is arresting, and the way that Plath captures the vivid life happening around Esther, news events, magazine parties, accentuates the deadening illness that drives her towards suicidal feelings. Plath herself would commit suicide one month after the novel’s publication in 1963. 34/40 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Roald Dahl
Harry Potter may be more popular, but Willy Wonka is altogether weirder. From the overwhelming poverty experienced by Charlie Bucket and his family, to the spoilt, greedy, brattish children who join Charlie on his trip to Willy Wonka’s phantasmagorical sweet factory there is nothing artificially sweetened in Roald Dahl’s startling work of fantasy. 35/40 Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy
Andrew Davies’s recent TV adaptation of War and Peace reminded those of us who can’t quite face returning to the novel’s monstrous demands just how brilliantly Tolstoy delineates affairs of the heart, even if the war passages will always be a struggle. In Anna Karenina – enormous, too! –the great Russian novelist captures the erotic charge between the married Anna and the bachelor Vronsky, then drags his heroine through society’s scorn as their affair takes shape, without ever suggesting we move from her side. 36/40 Dangerous Liaisons, Pierre Choderlos de Laclos
The most deliciously wicked experience in literature, this epistolary novel introduces us to the Marquise de Merteuil and Vicomte de Valmont, who play cruel games of sexual conquest on their unwitting victims. The Marquise’s justification for her behaviour – “I, who was born to revenge my sex and master yours” – will strike a chord in the #metoo era, but emotions, even love, intrude, to the point where Laclos’s amorality becomes untenable. Sexy but very, very bad. 37/40 100 Years of Solitude, Gabriel Garcia Marquez
The energy and enchantment of Garcia Marquez’s story of seven generations of the Buendia family in a small town in Colombia continue to enthrall half a century on. Hauntings and premonitions allied to a journalistic eye for detail and a poetic sensibility make Marquez’s magical realism unique. 38/40 The Trial, Frank Kafka
“Someone must have been telling lies about Josef K…” So begins Kafka’s nightmarish tale of a man trapped in an unfathomable bureaucratic process after being arrested by two agents from an unidentified office for a crime they’re not allowed to tell him about. Foreshadowing the antisemitism of Nazi-occupied Europe, as well as the methods of the Stasi, KGB, and StB, it’s an unsettling, at times bewildering, tale with chilling resonance. 39/40 Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier
The second Mrs de Winter is the narrator of Du Maurier’s marvellously gothic tale about a young woman who replaces the deceased Rebecca as wife to the wealthy Maxim de Winter and mistress of the Manderley estate. There she meets the housekeeper Mrs Danvers, formerly devoted to Rebecca, who proceeds to torment her. As atmospheric, psychological horror it just gets darker and darker. 40/40 The Leopard, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa
Published posthumously in 1958, Tomasi di Lampedusa’s novel is set in 19th century Sicily, where revolution is in the air. The imposing Prince Don Fabrizio presides over a town close to Palermo during the last days of an old world in which class stratifications are stable and understood. Garibaldi’s forces have taken the island and a new world will follow. It’s a deep and poetic meditation on political change and the characters that it produces.
One brave teacher stood out. Herr Krauss, Carle’s art teacher, took a great personal risk to show the eager student reproductions of forbidden work by artists the Nazis dubbed “degenerate”, such as Picasso, Klee, Matisse and some German Expressionists. Carle later said it had been “a shock” to be shown real art. “I was used to art being flag-waving, gun-toting Aryans – super-realistic Aryan farmers, the women with their brute arms,” he said in 2009.
His temporary escape from the savage reality of life as a child in Nazi Germany came from his uplifting experiences with nature. The walks in meadows and woods with his father Erich were times he remembered as among the happiest of his life. “When I was a small child, as far back as I can remember, my father would take me by the hand and we would go out in nature, and he would show me worms and bugs and bees and ants and explain their lives to me,” Carle told The New York Times in 1994. “It was a very loving relationship.”
As Germany began to fall apart towards the end of the Second World War, his drafted father was taken prisoner in a camp in the Soviet Union. When they met again on a station platform in 1947, the first time Carle had seen his father for eight years, the 18-year-old was shocked by the “bundle of misery” he saw in front of him. Carle, who had been evacuated during the war, says his father was “a broken man”, physically and psychology destroyed. Read more
He weighed just six stone and wore rags and shoes held together by string. He spent the next few years in and out of sanatoriums before dying prematurely. “To this day,” Carle told The Independent in 2005, “I can barely enjoy a good meal because of thinking about my father. I am left with a sadness. It might be psychobabble, but I rehash that period of my life through my books. The child I am helping might just be me.”
In 1952, Carle arrived back in New York with $40 in his pocket. He landed a job as a graphic designer for The New York Times before being drafted into the US army during the Korean War. He was stationed in Germany as a mail clerk, a posting that brought back grisly memories of the time, as a 15-year-old, he’d had to dig trenches for the Nazis on the Siegfried line.
After his time in the army ended, he returned to his old job at The New York Times , before switching to a job on Madison Avenue as the art director at an advertising agency specialising in pharmaceutical campaigns. He worked in that field for several years before a twist of fate took him into the world of children’s literature
Eric Carle’s book has won many awards since it was first published in 1969
In 1967, author Bill Martin Jr spotted a distinctive red lobster Carle had painted for an advert for antihistamine tablets. Martin got in touch with Carle and asked him to illustrate a children’s book called Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? It was the turning point of Carle’s life. The idea “set me on fire”, he admitted. “I bought my two children a book once in a while, but I had no deep interest in children’s books whatsoever,” Carle said in that 1994 interview. “Everyone always assumes I love children. I do, but I don’t want to be surrounded by them. I’m about average when it comes to children: I like some, and some I don’t like.”
After working with Martin, Carle began thinking about creating his own book. One day he was idly playing with a hole puncher, making holes in a stack of papers. He thought of a fat bookworm and began sketching out a story called A Week with Willi the Worm . His editor Ann Beneduce did not warm to the idea of a worm and suggested that he turned the character into a caterpillar.
The idea for a distinctive hole running through the pages caused problems but Beneduce located a Japanese printer able to produce copies for an economical cost and the book was published by The World Publishing Company with little fanfare on a Tuesday in June 1969, a day overshadowed by news of a naval disaster that cost 74 American lives. The Very Hungry Caterpillar was far from an instant success and sales were slow. “It took five or six years for me to make enough money to live a very modest life,” Carle says. Read more
Over the course of the next five decades, Carle became one of the most celebrated author-illustrator’s of children’s fiction in the world, his distinctive collages delighting readers in more than 70 books. Among his famous fans are Barack and Michelle Obama. Former president George Bush Jr even nominated The Very Hungry Caterpillar as his favourite story when he was a child – which is surprising given that he was 23 when it first came out.
Musician Dolly Parton, who has been a fervent campaigner for children’s literacy through her Imagination Library (“she’s an amazing literacy philanthropist,” says Carle), has even written an “Afterword” for a special 50th commemorative edition of the book published by Philomel, the children’s imprint of Penguin in America.
So why is this book such a classic?
The original edition was small enough for a young child to hold and the interactive element of little fingers prodding through the holes in the pages, which mimic the caterpillar’s chomping, had an obvious immediate appeal. This design feature was incorporated so well it felt like a natural part of the book. The Very Hungry Caterpillar is a simply told story, one that every child can identify with – the excitement of eating all those delights, concern for the poorly caterpillar who didn’t know any better and relief that he has not only survived, but has actually transformed. It is a magical, happy ending. The language, like the artwork, is simple and charming.
Actor Mary-Louise Parker and Eric Carle read The Very Hungry Caterpillar in The New York Public Library (Getty)
Furthermore, The Very Hungry Caterpillar is a model “learning story”, which draws in both adults and children time and time again. From the familiarity of counting fruit – one apple, two pears, three plums – to sequencing the days of the week and arriving at Saturday, when seasoned readers can evaluate the nutritional value of foods consumed, or older readers can enjoy the challenge of memorising them, from one piece of chocolate cake, to the final slice of watermelon.
Above all is the science behind the life cycle of this particular caterpillar that is gently woven into the story, from the egg and caterpillar, through cocoon and the much-anticipated final stage. However many times they have heard the story before, children are stunned anew by the change, the colour and beauty of Carle’s butterfly, when they turn the final page. A perfect story ending.
“Most children can identify with the helpless, small, insignificant caterpillar, and they rejoice with it when it turns into a beautiful butterfly,” Carle told People in March 2019. “It is an affirmation to all children. It says: ‘I too can grow up. I too can unfold my wings and fly into the world’. I think it’s this message of hope that resonates.” Read more
There have been numerous spin-offs from the book over 50 years, including toys, puzzles, cutlery, clothes, video games, bed linen, cards and even shower gel. A special commemorative song, written and produced by Matt Rever, has earned more than a million hits on YouTube. One spin-off deemed a flop was the 1993 television adaptation made by the production company that filmed The Snowman . “It was awful. God-awful. I’m ashamed of it,” says Carle.
Carle’s second wife Barbara, a former special educational needs teacher, was instrumental in helping set up The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, Massachusetts, which opened in 2002. Around that time, she moved with him to Florida, where he continued to work in a studio he had designed, one full of light from the large picture windows. Carle, who always wears a lab coat to work, continued working after Barbara’s death in 2015. His unique style, using colourful acrylic paints and thin tissue-paper collage, continues to beguile readers. He has another book coming out in July called What’s Your Favorite Food?
His wonderful legacy includes Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me ; Does a Kangaroo Have a Mother, Too? ; Slowly, Slowly, Slowly, Said the Sloth ; Mister Seahorse ; The Very Busy Spider ; and the wonderful The Very Quiet Cricket, which is about a lonely cricket who starts to sing again after meeting his true love. Carle says the tale was evoked by memories of the time he spent outdoors with his father. Carle’s own favourites, incidentally, were Why Noah Chose the Dove , a book he illustrated for Isaac Bashevis Singer, and his own Do You Want to Be My Friend?
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Carle sometimes told children he met at book signings that “growing up can be very difficult”. He was convinced that young readers love The Very Hungry Caterpillar because it arouses simple emotions and a sense of hope. His book conjures those feelings in adult readers, too, not least for the dream that after a week of gorging – through apples, strawberries, plums, pears, an ice cream cone, chocolate cake, a pickle, a slice of Swiss cheese, a piece of salami, a lollipop, a piece of cherry pie, a sausage, a cupcake and one slice of watermelon – it’s possible to re-emerge as a beautiful butterfly.
Experts have pointed out that some of the details in Carle’s illustrations are wrong – the butterfly wings are on upside down – a detail that has never bothered the amiable author. “It’s true,” he says. “They are on upside down, but it’s a fantasy. I am the artist and can do whatever I want.”

‘Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark’ official trailer [Video]

Memo to America’s parents: Guillermo del Toro believes your children are desperately in need of a good scare. And the Oscar-winning director of The Shape of Water is here to tingle their young spines with Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark , a feature-length film version of the short-story collections that reared an entire generation of horror fans in the ‘80s and ‘90s. (Watch the all-new trailer for the film above.) Speaking at a New York press event, Del Toro revealed that he was a voracious reader of the books as well, even though he was technically outside of the target YA age demographic when the first installment hit shelves in 1981. “I found them really chilling,” he remarked of author Alvin Schwartz’s re-tellings of classic folks stories and urban legends like “High Beams” and “The Hook.” “They had the profound simplicity of a story told at a campfire.”
Even scarier than Schwartz’s prose, though, were the eerie illustrations by Stephen Gammell. The artist’s renderings of ghastly monsters, decaying bodies and big toes kept many readers (this one included) up late into the night. (Gammell’s artwork was controversially replaced for a 2011 reprinting , but has been restored in subsequent editions .) Del Toro — who owns several pieces of original Scary Stories artwork — reassured fans that he and the film’s director, André Øvredal, remained faithful to Gammell’s imagery in the creature design, which relies on practical effects rather than digital imagery.
“The one I was happiest to be part of the film was Harold ,” Øvredal told journalists, referring to the story of a scarecrow who literally climbs off his pole to seek revenge against a pair of abusive farmers. The director also pointed to ‘80s classics like Poltergeist as a direct inspiration for the tone and content of Scary Stories . “It’s a very human story of a family, and has a sense of humor that is very character-based. The scares are PG-13, but they’re still really frightening! They were able to frighten me as a kid with that movie without going nasty about it.”
Del Toro and Øvredal were on the same page about mining a similar PG-13 vein with their version of Scary Stories . “I wanted this to be a family horror film,” Del Toro said, adding that they deliberately avoided going the anthology route in favor of a more classical narrative approach. “[Anthology films] are always as bad as the worst story, and never as good as the best one.” Set in 1968, the film follows small-town teenager Stella (Zoe Colletti) as she and her friends come into possession of a magical book that susses out their specific fears and then creates a story that brings those fears to life.
“We adapted the stories to fit the characters,” Del Toro explained, and he brought visual evidence to prove it. Journalists saw two full sequences from the film, one that adapts “ The Big Toe ” and another based on “ The Red Spot .” We’re happy to report that both sequences are classically ‘80s in their form and content. Fans of Arachnophobia will be particularly tickled by the many creepy-crawlies in the latter sequence, although actual arachnophobes may need serious counseling. And Del Toro vowed that just because the cast is predominantly made up of kids doesn’t mean there won’t be a significant body count. “In my movies, kids do die.”
Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark arrives in theaters on Aug. 9.

Author Viet Thanh Nguyen | Podcast | American Masters | PBS

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Viet Thanh Nguyen discusses growing up in the U.S. as a refugee from Vietnam, and how writing and reading helped him cope with this difficult experience. He explains how his Pulitzer Prize-winning debut novel “The Sympathizer” (2015) and short story collection “The Refugees” (2017) were partly inspired by his problems with cultural representation in American pop culture and literature.
Transcript Print Josh Hamilton: I’m Josh Hamilton.
Joe Skinner: And I’m Joe Skinner.
Josh Hamilton: And this is the American Masters Podcast, where we have conversations with the people who change us. Today, we talk to Pulitzer Prize-winning author Viet Thanh Nguyen.
Viet Thanh Nguyen: Great works of art can be utterly racist because they are expressions of deep racism within the culture. It took me a long time to understand my mission as a writer, besides writing something great hopefully, was to also contest this deep-seated racism at the heart of the canonical tradition.
Josh Hamilton: Viet Thanh Nguyen burst onto the literary scene with his debut novel, The Sympathizer , in 2015. The book takes place in the aftermath of the Vietnam War, and serves as a critical re-examination of the American-centric view of the war. Nguyen’s work gives voice to a Vietnamese perspective in ways that he has said classic American films like Apocalypse Now and Platoon fall short. The novel went on to win the 2016 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction.
Joe Skinner: As you’ll see in our interview, Viet Thanh Nguyen is also a deep intellectual thinker. It was such a pleasure to talk to someone who is so willing to dive deep into the American literary canon, and into the politics of storytelling.
Josh Hamilton: After the fall of Saigon in 1975, Nguyen’s family fled to America, where he was separated from his parents at the age of 4. These experiences, in part, led to his most recent short story collection, The Refugees , which continues his legacy of urgent writing about underrepresented communities, whose stories need to be heard now more than ever. Joe recently met up with Viet in Los Angeles.
Joe Skinner: Thank you Viet for coming in. Can you describe the journey that your family had to undertake when South Vietnam fell to the North in 1975?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: Well when that happened we were living in our hometown which is Buan Me Thuot in the central highlands of Vietnam. And in March 1975, it was the first town the Communists captured. And my mom was there, my brother was there, I was there and our adopted sister, and my dad was in Saigon so lines of communication were cut off. My mom had to make a life and death decision and she decided that we were going to flee the town and try to find my father. And she took my brother and me but left my adopted sister behind and assuming that we would come back, which was a reasonable assumption during that time. Didn’t come back for 20 years. My parents didn’t come back. So we were separated. My parents were separated from her for 20 years. We made it to this, through the perilous trek on foot to Nha Trang, which is a port town, caught a boat to Saigon, found my father and a month later did the same thing all over again when the Communists captured Saigon too. And I think we made it to Guam and then took a flight to Pennsylvania which is where we ended up.
Joe Skinner: What made your family decide to go to Pennsylvania?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: I don’t think we had a choice. At that time, there were four refugee camps set up in the United States and I think everybody probably wanted to end up in California at Camp Pendleton but for whatever reason we ended up in Harrisburg at Fort Indiantown Gap. And that’s where our American lives began.
Joe Skinner: And what was it like for your family to finally go back after 20 years?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: When they went back it was the early 1990s, and this was right after the United States reestablished relationships with Vietnam and for whatever reason my parents didn’t invite me to come along. I think I was probably still in school. And I don’t know exactly what it is that they saw or what they experienced, but they went back twice in the early 90s, and after the second time, over Thanksgiving, my father said to me, “We’re Americans now,” and they never returned to Vietnam after that.
Joe Skinner: Wow. Why do you think he said that?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: After the war ended Vietnam went through a very difficult period that was brought about both by communist economic policy but also by the American embargo. But the United States basically continued the Vietnam War by other means. And so Vietnam was an isolated poor country, starving country. In the 1980s I believe it was the fifth poorest country in the world at that time. It was really devastating. So by the early 1990s when my parents came back, Vietnam was just starting to come out of that, and the conditions were, from what I understood, to be still really desperate. And especially if you were overseas Vietnamese, Viet Gayo, and you came back, the perception of your Vietnamese relatives was that you were rich and they were poor. And people were desperate. And so I think that was what my parents encountered and I saw a little bit of that when I came back for the first time in 2002, and it can be a very difficult emotional experience not to mention a difficult financial experience for everybody involved.
Joe Skinner: So when you went back in 2002 you visited relatives?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: I went back in 2002 as a tourist for two weeks at the persuasion of my then-girlfriend now my wife. I didn’t really have any inclination to go, and so we decided to go back as tourists to have fun to get acclimated to the country. And it was a lot of fun. And then in 2004, we went back for seven months. For me, it was to study Vietnamese, and I spent four months studying Vietnamese formally in order to meet my relatives. And that was when I saw them for the first time.
Joe Skinner: Wow. In your short story collection, The Refugees, you have a character named Liem, who dreads having to tell his story of leaving Saigon or having to rehearse it – as you write. What did you tell people when you were growing up about this? About the story of your family coming over. Did you tell people this story?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: I don’t think anybody ever asked, if we’re speaking about people who are not Vietnamese. People who are Vietnamese, who are Vietnamese refugees in the United States all had the same stories of a similar kind. Right. In order to get to the United States, anybody from Southeast Asia, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Laotian, had to endure something really horrible to get here. And so it was you know we talked about that sometimes but it was very matter of fact. Because, what we went through was actually not that bad, because no one died. When we left, we left behind an adopted sister, an adopted daughter. But no one died. No one went to prison. My adopted sister had to go work as a so-called youth volunteer to help rebuild the country which is basically hard labor. But it wasn’t a prison or re-education camp. So that was a weird experience because this trauma that everybody underwent was simply normal in the Vietnamese refugee community. So you didn’t really have to explain anything. And people who are not Vietnamese never asked. I think it was because they just didn’t understand. It was a really foreign experience, Americans who knew anything about the Vietnam War knew only the American experience and were focused on that. Vietnamese refugees, the only way that most Americans had a way of making sense of that was through referencing American experience. And so I had no interest in explaining myself to Americans in that way.
Joe Skinner: When did you realize that you wanted to be a writer?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: I think the first seeds were planted when I was very young. I loved to read. That was my way of coping with being a refugee. You know my parents were never at home. And so I read a lot, and in the second or third grade, I had the opportunity to write a book in class that became Lester the Cat . I drew and illustrated that book, bound it, it won a prize from the public library. And I thought wow this is this is kind of fun. And so that idea was always in my mind and I think by the time I was in high school I had some vague idea that I wanted to be a writer. And when I went to college you know I told my college classmates I’m going to, I was 18 years old I’m going to be a published novelist by the time I’m 25. And they said wow that’s really impressive. And of course, that never happened. I had no idea what it meant to be a writer. But I think from an early point I had that fantasy, and it just took a long time for me to develop the ability and the discipline to actually write.
Joe Skinner: Sounds like you were a published writer at a very young age with Lester the Cat .
Viet Thanh Nguyen: I don’t have that book anymore. I wish I did.
Joe Skinner: So if artists and cultural icons serve as a series of windows and mirrors for young people, what kind of writers were you reading when you were growing up and, or what kind of artists or cultural figures outside of writing were you looking up to and sort of seeing as potential windows or mirrors for your future?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: When I was growing up in San Jose, California as a kid, and as an adolescent, I think I was reading everything I could in the public library, so you know the kinds of kid’s books I was reading were you know what probably what many others were reading you know Curious George and things like that. And a lot of science fiction, a lot of fantasy. So Lord of the Rings and Anne McCaffery’s Dragon series I mean the whole list of things. And so I think just, in general, the idea of literature as an escape, as a magical world of narrative, just captured me in general and it wasn’t really till I got to college that specific kinds of writers really gave me this idea that there was something with writing that could be a mission for me. And before then again it was all fantasy. You know when I was in high school I read the Romantic poets, memorized Romantic poetry, so I could try to seduce girls you know that kind of thing. But in college, it became much more serious. And that’s when I started to read literature by people of color; Chicano authors, African-American authors, Asian-American authors. So this is what I encountered in college. You know people like Toni Morrison and Ralph Ellison, who were major influences on my work, or Maxine Hong Kingston who was actually my teacher as well. I was a very bad student in her writing class. But it was writers like this who could clearly connect for me the beauty of literature and all that it could accomplish in the terms, at the level of aesthetic experience. Just the pleasure of reading connecting that with the political and social possibilities of literature to address our difficult histories. It was these writers that really became my inspirations and models.
Joe Skinner: Is there an artist or storyteller from the past whose stories you feel have not been given their proper due?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: That’s actually a hard question. I mean the writers that I’ve cited I think have all been given their proper due. And then when you look back at these literary traditions, the hard part is trying to figure out who is owed what. So if we speak just about Asian-American literature you know that’s what I did my dissertation on. I can look back at this tradition, I can name a dozen writers who were really important to me and completely unknown to anybody who’s not a specialist of that literature. And have they been given their proper due? In the context of Asian-American literature, yes, people like Carlos Bulosan who wrote, America is in the Heart in 1946 or John Okada who published No-No Boy in 1956. They are recognized by Asian-American readers, but they’re not really by the larger American context. So I think they haven’t been given their proper due. Someone like me comes along and even though it’s difficult for me or for anybody else to become a writer I recognize that my possibilities have been shaped by decades of struggle of writers who came before me who had none of the opportunities that I did. So you take someone like John Okada he came back from World War II. He actually fought in World War II as a Japanese-American even though his family was imprisoned in a concentration camp–came back, wrote No-No Boy which was the first novel by a Japanese-American to deal with the internment–by anybody–to deal with the internment. And that novel immediately disappeared because no one wanted to read it. Neither Americans nor Japanese-Americans. That takes a huge amount of guts to do something like that. This is really before the era of MFA programs or anything like that. If you’re a Japanese-American writer now writing about the Japanese-American internment, half a dozen publishers will be interested in your book. So that is what I think about when I think about writers who didn’t get their due. The difficulties that they faced, they faced a completely different world in the 19th and 20th centuries than someone like me or people of my generation have. And that’s why I think it’s always crucial you know in response to your question to always bring up these traditions of writers who basically sacrificed themselves for their art and never got compensated or recognized in their own lifetimes the way they should have been.
Joe Skinner: Are there people today that you think aren’t getting the type of interest in their work that you think maybe 50 years from now you think they will be getting that kind of recognition or they should be?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: I think that’s hard to say. I think that now we are living in a very different environment than let’s say Carlos Bulosan or John Okada were in the 1940s and 1950s. I mean they obviously did eventually get published and Bulosan actually did get a significant amount of recognition for his work. But then he was a communist. OK so then in 1950s it became unfashionable to be communist, and he got buried basically. Today’s environment I think is different because of the mechanisms of publishing and because of the changes in our discourse about race and culture and identity. So that it’s hard to say that there would be a writer who had something worthwhile to say who wouldn’t have had at least the opportunity to be to be heard, to be to have his work or her work looked at by an agent or a publisher and so on because these publishing mechanisms are hungry for anything that constitutes new material. Right. So I think that the question of race or ethnicity or culture is not really the one that limits writers’ opportunities. I think it’s really a question of aesthetics or the politics of their work. So writers who are really avant-garde who are really pushing the boundaries in different ways. They, I think might have a harder time getting published by mainstream press or writers whose politics are completely confrontational with American culture would have a hard time. Asserting your racial identity is not problematic in the liberal world of publishing. Being a communist is problematic. Advocating for terrorism is problematic. There are still red lines in our culture that make it very difficult to cross. Now there are maybe writers who were doing all those things. I’m not sure who they are.
Joe Skinner: Do you think that there should be a change to the way artists are considered part of the canon? Like what makes somebody an American Master? Or what makes somebody an American writer or even an American?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: Well to answer your first question about what makes someone an American Master. I think it is usually a process of consensus after a struggle, you know like someone like Philip Roth for example. Everybody would call him an American Master now. His period of a struggle sort of happened a long time ago in the 1950s when he was emerging, he was a controversial, you know Jewish-American writer. Now he’s just an American writer. Now he’s just a global writer. You know, I went to Paris recently, and in the major department store there in their bookstore there was a whole table devoted to Philip Roth, right. So he’s an American Master. Now whether his legacy will survive, who knows? If one-hundred years from now he’ll be read in the same way and I think that’s part of the difficulty who we call, who we have a consensus about now as an American Master may not be the consensus we have from a one-hundred years ago. The struggle will continue. Right. So that’s why it’s I think it’s always critical to recognize canonization for the fraught process that it is, it’s very difficult in the contemporary moment to be sure that who we think will be a part of the canon will be a part of the canon. Norman Mailer, he was an American Master 20 years ago, now his reputation is already sort of in doubt. Who knows what it will be in 50 years. Melville, when he died nobody, thought of him as an American Master. It took until the 1920s and 1930s before he became the Herman Melville we know it today. So I think someone like me participating in the series I have to look at this in a very ironic fashion. You know this is a very contemporary kind of framing of my work, and I have no foolish belief that this will be the same consensus a hundred years from now. And part of being an American Master I think is as you said, tied into that notion of who we think of as an American. Take the Philip Roth example. In the 1950s he was Jewish-American. His reputation has changed the status of people who are Jewish in this country has changed. They’ve become white for a variety of different kinds of reasons, and I think that’s helped in the process of canonizing Philip Roth and he himself was a part of that transformation of Jewish people into white people. And so likewise someone like John Okada in the 1950s would not be considered white. He would not even be considered American by a lot of people even though he was born in the United States. But now we’re in a situation in which if you’re Japanese-American, you are an American. We’ve changed, we’ve struggled, we’ve fought. And so someone like Julie Otsuka, who published in the early 2000s a couple of really great novels about the Japanese-American internment and about Japanese-American culture. She’s automatically considered an American writer. So things have changed, and that is where canonization and the transformation of American culture go hand in hand. Right. So that literature can never be divorced from all the social and political struggles that we’ve had to undergo to contest what it means to be an American and therefore to contest who is allowed into the canon of American culture and can be called an American Master.
Joe Skinner: Wow. Can you talk a little bit about your experience watching Apocalypse Now when you were a kid?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: In the early 1980s my parents brought home a VCR. I think they were actually pioneers in terms of this technology, consuming this technology. And I think after I watched Star Wars a dozen times, Apocalypse Now was one of the first movies that I turned to, and I don’t know why. I mean back in those days you actually had to go to a video store and rent the videos and there was a limited selection, you know. And I don’t even know how I heard about Apocalypse Now except that I was already sort of a war junkie at this time at 10 or 11 years of age. So anything about war interested me, and I sort of I think vaguely understood that it was about Vietnam and I understood that I was from Vietnam. I’m not even sure I’d even seen anything about the Vietnam War yet at that time, and so watching that movie was a really weird experience because my experience of watching war movies had been through watching John Wayne or Audie Murphy in these really highly sanitized versions of World War II, for example. And then here comes this really psychedelic, weird, violent, obscene film. And I think I just wasn’t ready for it. I watched it from beginning to end, and I understood very little about the beginning and the end which are very strange. But what I did understand was the middle, which is actually a little bit more conventional, and watching that movie was a really difficult experience for me because the middle of the movie is all about the American sailors massacring the Vietnamese civilians. And I know in retrospect obviously that Coppola was doing this in order to exhibit the brutality that was going on and what American sailors were doing and all of that. But from my perspective as a little kid watching that movie, I was identifying with the American sailors, as I would watching a John Wayne movie, up until the moment they killed Vietnamese civilians. Because at that point I realized I was also a Vietnamese person and that my only role in this movie was to be like those civilians on the boat getting killed. This was really my first moment of real exposure with the depths of American racism. In my own personal life, I had only rarely encountered direct racism to my face. And somehow this moment even though it wasn’t personal, it wasn’t like an individual doing this to me, it felt intensely personal because I knew that this was being directed at me. Not that I think Coppola was doing it on purpose. I think the power of racism is such that he didn’t have to do it on purpose. The assumption could simply be that Vietnamese people had no speaking role whatsoever in this American imagination. Americans don’t think of that as racist, but it is racist. And I think I understood it viscerally and intuitively at that point and it would take a very long time for me to try to work through it to understand it, to understand how popular culture can be racist, to understand how narratives can be racist, can be incredibly powerful. You know I would go back for example and I would read, roughly around a few years later I read Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness on which the film was loosely based, I read Chinua Achebe’s critique of Heart of Darkness as a racist story, even if it was aesthetically a masterpiece, for Achebe, it’s still a racist story. And I think those two things are utterly compatible. Great works of art can be utterly racist because they are expressions of deep racism within the culture. And so it took me a long time to understand, to make sense out of this, and to understand that my mission as a writer besides writing something great hopefully, was to also contest this deep-seeded racism at the heart of the canonical tradition that Apocalypse Now and the Heart of Darkness both represent.
Joe Skinner: And so was this experience really the seedling for what led to The Sympathizer ?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: I think so because–but it wasn’t the only thing. I think so because from that point onwards I began to be very interested in the Vietnam War. I read everything I could that was available in the library which meant reading things that were way beyond my comprehension and my ability at 10 or 11 or 12 years of age, and I began to realize that there was very little written or filmed from the perspective of Vietnamese people, whoever they happen to be. And this history that was so important to me was being understood and articulated entirely through the perspective of Americans and mostly of white Americans. And I was an American, but I was not one of those Americans. And that meant that by the time I got around to writing The Sympathizer , I had spent 30 years thinking about the Vietnam War in one way or another both as as someone who was reading books and watching movies for entertainment, but also as a scholar who had been grappling with it as well. And so yes I became a scholar at least partially in order to make sense out of these works of art I was confronting. And this perception that I saw in the American imagination that the Vietnam War was to be understood purely through the American point of view and that we the Vietnamese people who were the ones most affected by the Vietnam War were to be rendered secondary, if at all rendered in the American imagination. And that this for me was something that I really would have to confront both for myself as a person but for myself as a writer because I was an American and yet not an American in this experience. And I wasn’t going to let that simply happen without me protesting against it in my own way.
Joe Skinner: Well The Sympathizer won the Pulitzer in 2016. So it seems like a very successful protest at least in terms of getting the kind of cultural recognition that the Pulitzer affords to a work of art. American Masters has a film coming up on fellow Pulitzer winner, Native-American writer N. Scott Momaday. For him, it was a huge surprise, and for the Native-American community a huge sense of recognition. What was your reaction to winning the Pulitzer and what was the Vietnamese-American community’s reaction?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: My reaction to winning the Pulitzer was pretty much utter shock and astonishment, you know, and also filtered into that was this awareness again of this process of canonization and what an award means and all of that and my awareness as a literary scholar that awards are not simply given out for some kind of universal idea of literary merit. But they are deeply contextual. I think The Sympathizer is a good novel. Whether it’s a great novel, time will have to decide that. Whether it’s worthy of the Pulitzer Prize, whether it was more worthy than any other book published that year. Time will have to decide that, right? But I think it’s a good novel. But what does the Pulitzer recognize? It’s a cultural and political function for the Pulitzer as well. So I think that partly my understanding of the Pulitzer is that it is a recognition of what America has done and what America has not said about the Vietnam War and giving someone like me the Pulitzer Prize… The odds of that happening were actually pretty good. Maybe not for me but somebody would come along. This is a mechanism of American society. You know we are a society based on genocide and conquest and imperialism and slavery and all these kinds of things and we are also a society that’s based on this idea that we are above and beyond of those things and how we are above and beyond that is that we allow people like me and N. Scott Momaday to write novels that get the Pulitzer Prize. That’s the conundrum that we’re in. And I think that anybody from our traditions who gets the prize like this has to be aware of that. You know we don’t win the Pulitzer Prize in order to then keep the Pulitzer Prize for ourselves or whatever literary prize or whatever literary recognition, we don’t become American Masters simply to say we’re the masters of the universe now. No. I mean I come from a tradition that says you win this prize in order to use this prize in order to bring attention to the very conditions that make this prize a necessity and to grow to help the other writers who are part of this tradition to continue doing this work that’s really crucial. And so that’s why I think the Vietnamese-American community responded so positively to this prize because they recognize that it’s not just for me, it’s for them too. Even if most of them had not read the novel, and they probably haven’t read the novel yet, they recognize that this is a transformation. We can ride on the cultural capital of this to transform what it means when we say we’re Vietnamese-Americans. We can now point to this book and say, look you got to read this book if you want to understand our perspective on the Vietnam War. But it’s only the beginning because it really my understanding of the Vietnam War, and of Vietnamese history and there are Vietnamese-American readers who object, who don’t agree. You know and that’s perfectly fine. But what the Pulitzer Prize should enable is not simply that I should write more books but that other Vietnamese-American writers should have more opportunities to publish their works and broaden our understanding of this history.
Joe Skinner: So what led you to put together your first short story collection, The Refugees ?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: When I started to think that I could become a writer, this was in college and then in graduate school and I thought, well I’m not ready to write a novel yet. So I’ll just write short stories because they are short so they will be easier and they’ll be a good training ground before I get to the real serious business of writing a novel. And of course short stories are actually really really difficult to write. I didn’t figure that out until I was in the middle of it, it took 17 years to write that short story collection. And again the impetus behind it was to write about Vietnamese people, mostly in the United States but also in Vietnam. And to tell stories that were of interest to me. So it was really a haphazard way of writing this book. When I was writing it I mean, I didn’t have an overarching theme beyond Vietnamese people and then I think as the book evolved I began to see that they were about refugees and that if they were about refugees they were also about haunting and about loss because that is something that binds all refugees together, Vietnamese and otherwise. And then finally, the last step in writing that book was also to think that I’m also writing a book that I believe is about Vietnamese people and about refugees but it’s also about these universal experiences. They’re completely commensurate with each other. And I wanted to demonstrate that I could also write about people who are not Vietnamese. So that’s why the book has stories about people who are not Vietnamese written from their perspective. And that’s partially because Vietnamese people don’t live their lives simply with Vietnamese people, we interact with everybody else and the lives of Vietnamese people are completely integrated with these other people. And of course as a writer I want to demonstrate that I can do other things besides write about people who are just like me. I can write about anybody that was partly the ambition in The Refugees is to tie the lives of Americans and Vietnamese together through this universal experience of refugees and what they’ve brought to the United States and what the United States did to them.
Joe Skinner: Well I felt a tremendous amount of empathy when I read the book. And I was really surprised because I read that the stories actually came together in piecemeal from over a long period of time. But it feels so cohesive. Was there kind of an editing process to make that cohesive feeling or were these truly just disparate pieces that you then chose and collected?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: Well I think that hopefully if they’re cohesive part of the reason why is that there is at least a certain historical frame for them, the refugee experience. They are unified by these ideas that I mentioned about how refugees are bound together by haunting and loss so that those threads run throughout all the stories and give them that coherence even if the stories are all about different individuals who don’t actually overlap with each other. And I think that what happened in the process of writing the stories is what happens to every writer. You know you suffer through writing a story through multiple drafts like one story, the opening story, Black Eyed Women, took 50 drafts over 17 years. To the writer, to someone like me, it’s a horrible experience and it’s not a cohesive experience and you experience the story in fragments. But if you do the job right, at least for a realistic short story after that process what the reader encounters is something cohesive. The reader doesn’t see all the labor and the suffering. Doesn’t see the seams in the story and that’s the way it should be for that kind of a short story. So if in fact you did experience empathy and did experience the collection as something coherent, then I did my job and I didn’t expose you to all the nasty kinds of stuff that went on behind the scenes.
Joe Skinner: Can you talk a little bit about the difference between identifying as an immigrant versus identifying as a refugee?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: Americans think of the United States as a country of immigrants whether they like it or not. Americans still fundamentally believe that immigration has happened to this country. Some Americans think it’s made the country great some Americans think it’s made the country worse. But immigration is still fundamental. So when a newcomer to the United States, or someone who’s a newcomer but who’s been here for a few decades calls herself or himself an immigrant to other Americans, Americans can immediately make sense out of that whether they like it or not. A refugee is different because a refugee is actually not a part of the American mythology, is not really a part of the American dream. Americans don’t generally think of refugees at all and when they encounter refugees they sort of automatically simply subsumed the refugee under the general category of the immigrant which then allows Americans to make sense out of them, because in the American imagination. Immigrants come to this country because of the American dream. America is a great country. The immigrants come here to try to better themselves. That affirms America to Americans, even if they want to kick those immigrants out or keep them from coming. Refugees have to be subsumed under that category for Americans because it makes that American mythology work. But if you were to actually think about the refugee and why the refugees came to this country oftentimes it’s because of desperate conditions that the United States helped to create. Right. So the Vietnam War for example, or what’s happening south of the border of the United States in terms of drug wars, in terms of American intervention in Central America in the 1980s. These all helped to create refugees. But if you call these people refugees then you have to start thinking about American culpability and American responsibility and then you think it’s easier to call them immigrants or undocumented immigrants. In the case of people coming from Guatemala for example. So that’s why it’s been important for me to say I’m a refugee and not an immigrant because I don’t want to let Americans off the hook by pretending I’m something I’m not. And I want Americans to think about why I’m a refugee. Why my family are refugees, why most of the Vietnamese people in this country who are here came as refugees. And I call myself a refugee so that other refugees can hear that happening. Because a lot of refugees, former refugees, simply call themselves immigrants without even really thinking about it. And when I bring it up to them they say, “Yeah. I call myself an immigrant because no one really wants to talk to a refugee or about what a refugee experience is like. It’s too uncomfortable. And it’s too stigmatizing to call myself a refugee.” And so I want to stand up and say I don’t care about the stigma. I want to call myself a refugee so that we can have this conversation about how I happened to come here and how all these Vietnamese refugees happen to be here.
Joe Skinner: Well thank you so much. You know, there’s one Quote: : from The Refugees that really sticks with me because I just can’t quite figure it out. It’s at the end of Black Eyed Women, one of the stories that you wrote. The character says, “Stories are just things we fabricate, nothing more. We search for them in a world besides our own, then leave them here to be found. Garments shed by ghosts.” What does that mean?
Viet Thanh Nguyen: As a writer, I struggle constantly with the question of, are stories important? I think stories are important. Many people I think in this world don’t think stories are that important, even if they live with stories all the time. So part of my task as a writer is not simply to say, “Read literature, it’s good for you.” Part of my task as a writer is to go out there and say, “Look stories are all around us.” ‘Make America Great Again’ is a story, for example, there’s a very powerful story right. OK so there’s that going on. So I think a lot of people who don’t believe in the power of stories would simply say, “Stories are just things you guys make up. You writers, for example. They don’t really matter. You know they’re just entertainment or they’re just fictions you’re just wasting your time.” And yet I want to insist that in fact, yes we do fabricate stories, we do make up stories, and yet they’re really really crucial. They’re really really powerful. Make America Great Again is a story that is I think in fact haunted by ghosts, ghosts of the past. I mean Make America Great Again says, hey, there are all these ghosts of the past for the people who believe in Donald Trump that they believe have been suppressed and they need to come back. And there are all these other ghosts who have been sacrificed to American history that are going to be erased yet again in that narrative. And so for me as a refugee, as a Vietnamese-American, there are ghosts that haunt me as well, of my past, of history. And one of the reasons I became a writer is because of that haunting, is because of that legacy. And so in that particular story I wanted to make it literal. It really is about ghosts. I think being a writer is oftentimes about being haunted by something that’s really crucial to us and then trying to turn that somehow into a story that is a fabrication but is nevertheless absolutely crucial.
Joe Skinner: Thank you so much for coming in.
Viet Thanh Nguyen: Thanks for having me.
Josh Hamilton: In this excerpt from the upcoming film, American Masters – N. Scott Momaday: Words From A Bear , writer N. Scott Momaday discusses his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, House Made of Dawn . The film is slated to premiere on American Masters this fall on PBS.
Scott Momaday: I had something in me that I wanted to express, something deep within me, and it was important. And when it came time to write House Made of Dawn, I was writing it because it was there to write. I once heard that William Gass was asked the question, “Who do you write for?” And he said, “Well I don’t write for myself, that would be self-serving. I don’t write an audience that would be pandering. I write for the thing that is trying to be born.”

The Tiger Who Came To Tea author Judith Kerr dies aged 95 – ITV News

23 May 2019 at 11:24am The Tiger Who Came To Tea author Judith Kerr dies aged 95 Video report by ITV News Arts Editor Nina Nannar
Children’s book author and illustrator Judith Kerr has died at the age of 95.
Kerr, who wrote and illustrated a number of enduring children’s books including The Tiger Who Came To Tea, died at home on Wednesday following a short illness, her publisher HarperCollins said.
A much-loved and timeless classic, The Tiger Who Came To Tea has sold more than five million copies since it was first published in 1968, and it has never been out of print. Judith Kerr, author of the Tiger Who Came to Tea, has died at the age of 95 Credit: Gareth Fuller/PA
Earlier this year, Channel 4 announced it would air a special animated adaptation of the book, which tells the story of a tea-guzzling tiger, who turns up unannounced and eats and drinks Sophie and her mother out of house and home.
Kerr’s other works include When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit and the Mog the Cat series of books.
Ann-Janine Murtagh, executive publisher HarperCollins Children’s Books, said: “It has been the greatest honour and privilege to know and publish Judith Kerr for over a decade, though of course her history with HarperCollins goes back over 50 years.
Tributes to Judith Kerr from politicians to a best-selling author Comedian Josh Widdicombe posted on his Instagram: ”Bloody love Mog. RIP Judith Kerr” MP Anna Soubry tweeted: ”RIP the wonderful #JudithKerr – so many happy memories of reading the Mogg books and the lovely ‘Tiger who came for tea’ to my girls. What a remarkable legacy.” Former Chancellor now Evening Standard Editor, George Osborne, tweeted the second edition had been changed to feature The Tiger Who Came To Tea, on the front page and added: ”Thank you, to the late Judith Kerr, for your wonderful creation” Best-selling author Sophie Kinsella tweeted: ”Oh what very sad news. Judith Kerr gave all our family so much joy.”
In 2016, she was awarded a lifetime achievement award at London Zoo, the place that inspired her most famous book.
She explained how she used to tell her daughter the story after a trip to see the tigers at London Zoo.
“I told her other stories as well, but she wouldn’t have them,” she said.
“She was very bossy and she would say ‘talk the tiger’, so I kept telling her this story.” The Tiger Who Came To Tea has sold more than five million copies since it was first published in 1968. Credit: PA Columbine school shooting survivor found dead at home
“She came to visit our offices frequently – always bringing her books in person; often arriving on the number nine bus and leaving us all full of laughter and in awe of her astonishing zest for life and absolute commitment to delivering the very best books for children.
“Her incisive wit and dry humour made her both excellent company and a joy to publish. She embraced life as one great big adventure and lived every day to the full.
“She was absolutely thrilled when I gave her the news that she had been named Illustrator of the Year earlier this month.
“Her characters and books have delighted generations of children and provided some of the first and fondest reading memories of childhood.
“My thoughts at this time are with her children, Matthew and Tacy, and her grandchildren.” Judith Kerr with her OBE. Credit: PA
Charlie Redmayne, HarperCollins chief executive, said: “Judith Kerr was a wonderful and inspiring person who was much loved by everyone at HarperCollins.
“She was a brilliantly talented artist and storyteller who has left us an extraordinary body of work. Always understated and very, very funny, Judith loved life and loved people – and particularly she loved a party.
“Beautifully dressed and with a smile on her face she would light up the room and would always be one of the last to leave. Time spent in her company was one of life’s great privileges and I am so grateful to have known her.” ‘Forever on our bookshelves and in our imaginations’ Tributes have come in for Judith Kerr. Credit: PA
Writer Matt Haig tweeted: “Oh no. Judith Kerr. Tears in my eyes. Must have read The Tiger Who Came to Tea two hundred times to my kids. There was a time that was all they wanted.
“The best read aloud book there has ever been. I know 95 is a good age but I thought she’d live for ever like the tiger will.”
He added in a second tweet: “I even mention reading The Tiger Who Came to Tea in Reasons to Stay Alive as one of my reasons.”
Spandau Ballet’s Gary Kemp was among the people paying tribute to Kerr.
He tweeted: “Goodbye Judith Kerr. All my four boys have adored you and I’ve loved reading your work to them. Forever on our bookshelves and in our imaginations. #JudithKerr”.
Author Tony Parsons tweeted: “Some books light up the world. Thank you for The Tiger Who Came to Tea and rest well, Judith Kerr.”
Newsnight presenter Emily Maitlis shared her own memory of Kerr. She tweeted: “I remember asking #JudithKerr Kerr if the tiger symbolised the 1960s sexual revolution where normal mores and suburban life became upended by this wild and exotic creature.
“She told me no, it was about a tiger coming to tea.” Last updated Thu 23 May 2019

If You Believe in Love and Fate, You’ll Enjoy ‘The Sun Is Also a Star’

If You Believe in Love and Fate, You’ll Enjoy ‘The Sun Is Also a Star’ Rachel Epstein Photo credit: Design by Morgan McMullen More From Marie Claire Nicola Yoon’s The Sun Is Also a Star is one of those books you want to re-read over and over again. The 2016 YA novel about the fateful encounter between two teens, Natasha and Daniel, the day before Natasha is scheduled to be deported, is equally as beautiful as it is timely considering the current administration’s harsh immigration policies. I, personally, could not put the novel down. And watching the movie starring Yara Shahidi and Charles Melton (released May 17) further cemented that every single decision we make affects the life we live, and the other potential lives waiting for us when we, say, choose to take a different route to work in the morning. You just have to allow the universe to work its magic. #ReadWithMC reviewers agree that Yoon crafted a compelling story about life for an overachieving Korean-American guy and a Jamaican-born girl who just wants to experience the opportunities America has to offer. See exactly what #ReadWithMC had to say about the novel, below, then find out how you can have your review featured on the site for next month’s Marie Claire book club pick ( The Farm by Joanne Ramos), here . “So, I finished The Sun is Also A Star by Nicola Yoon and oh my was it good. The book starts out with Daniel and Natasha who meet when Daniel saves her life from a car accident. The two end up spending the day together and do a bunch of adventures together. Sounds like an awesome typical rom-com right?! WRONG! Natasha is also being deported and has no time to fall in love as her flight leaves at 10 p.m. that night. Overall, this book was a classic YA read. If you enjoyed [Yoon’s] other work, Everything, Everything , you will also enjoy this cute tale.” [email protected] “The beginning was a bit slow, but after getting into the bulk of the plot, I fell in love with Natasha and Daniel. Listening to the two of them bicker and discuss the universe, science, and fate just made my heart happy. The drama of race and traditional beliefs added to the rising action and the final fall. Now I can’t wait to watch the movie!” – Nicole on Goodreads “I forgot how much fun it is to read YA novels and this was one of the first books I’ve read this year where I was hooked after the first few pages. I was immediately drawn to the character of Natasha, who is strong, resilient, smart, and a realist, though not without flaws, like all of us. Because of her personality and her dynamic with Daniel, who’s more of a dreamer and an optimist, it provided an interesting juxtaposition for the reader to see and explore. In the end, I loved both characters so much and can’t wait to see the film.” [email protected] “Has this changed my mind about romance novels, YA or otherwise? No. But it was not as bad as I’d feared. On the one hand, yes, there’s lots of goopy, earnest, ‘lalala we just met but it’s true love and fate and destiny’ stuff that’s just not my bag. On the other hand, there’s a good deal here that is unconnected to the romance that I did like. For example, the chapter narrated by the waitress at the Korean restaurant was a perfect bittersweet amuse-bouche. For the most part, this is a day-long mooshy-sweet meet-cute between the rational scientific mind of a Jamaican immigrant facing imminent deportation and the hopeless romantic heart of a Korean-American poet about to disappoint his parents (yeah, that old story). It’s really fast-paced, served up in short, POV-switching chunks that alternate between our two young lovers, the people that will cross their path/alter their fate over the course of this single day, and some rather more dispassionate interjections from an unattributed, omniscient source popping in to drop knowledge about topics as varied as the multiverse or the evolution of eyeballs or why the African American haircare industry is almost entirely in the hands of Korean-American immigrants. These facts interest me.As for the rest, if you can embrace the fantasy of it, you will like the book more than me. (Both ‘more than I liked it’ and also, probably, more than you would like me ). I am an irredeemable curmudgeon full of practical concerns and I’m reading this thinking, Natasha, girl, you better go home and pack your things right now instead of traipsing all across town with some stranger-danger boy! ” – Karen on Goodreads Story continues “This book was amazing and it taught me so much. It taught me the effect that we can have on others life’s without when realizing it. It taught me that you can’t judge someone that you just met. There is no way that what you think about them will be correct. Everyone has a different story and you can’t just walk into the middle of someone’s chapter and judge them off the first sentence you read. I also loved how the book ended and how the chapters perspectives constantly switched. It was just beautiful.” [email protected] “Personally, I loved this book! If you don’t like romance, this is probably not the book for you. And no, I’m not the type of person to believe in love at first sight, but that’s in the book. I loved how it’s based on a Jamaican immigrant and a Korean-American, just like Nicola Yoon and her husband. It was simply magical.” – Elizabeth on Goodreads “This book takes place in New York and documents the POV of a few characters, the main two being Natasha and Daniel. Natasha faces deportation while Daniel has his interview with Yale, but somehow their days end up intertwined. This book was a slow start for me, as I had to remember who each of the characters were when they had a chapter in their POV, since sometimes they are a minor person. Overall, this book is a whirlwind and a rather good read as well as quite a short one (if you get going). I read it in two days!” [email protected] “I loved this book so much more than I expected to. The way it’s written is unique in the sense of how everything is laid out for you. You learn so much about every character that appears in this book. No character is too small to not have an impact on the story. Characters that you normally wouldn’t give a second thought about are given a whole new perspective, and it really makes you think. I also loved the way it ended. I’ve seen a few reviews saying the opposite-that they liked the book up until the ending. However, the ending that was given makes it a little more realistic, in my opinion, and therefore more relatable for some people. This was an easy read so it only took me about a day and a half to read. I can definitely see myself reading this again in the future.” – Cienna on Goodreads Missed out on our May pick? Starting June 1, we’ll be reading Joanne Ramos’ debut novel, The Farm . Learn more about the book and read an exclusive interview with the author here . For more stories like this, including celebrity news, beauty and fashion advice, savvy political commentary, and fascinating features, sign up for the Marie Claire newsletter.

One Excellent Day of Eating and Drinking in Corktown

Flipboard As Detroit’s oldest existing neighborhood, Corktown is the epicenter of the city’s restaurant surge and home to some of its most beloved bars (both old and new). Located within the boundaries of Southwest and west of downtown, the neighborhood was named from the influx of Irish immigrants who settled in the area during the mid-to-late 1800s. Today, Corktown’s scene feels as dynamic as ever thanks to a mixture of locals and a steady flow of young professionals and creatives into the area, drawn by the eclectic scene. With the recent investments by Ford Motor Company in a nearby office space and the forthcoming renovations of Corktown’s biggest landmark — the Michigan Central Station — the neighborhood is undergoing major changes. Despite the recent flood of money from property investors, a mix of lowkey pubs, music venues, and restaurants serving inventive food are maintaining the spirited and thrifty, DIY feel of the area for now. Chances are for folks who are visiting Detroit for the first time, will at some point find themselves in this neighborhood and it’s certainly worth the trip. There’s also an abundance of shops worth exploring and lovely residential streets filled with historic, colorful Victorian homes. Travelers will find the area relatively easy to navigate by foot or by bike and will never find themselves far from a good meal. One can easily spend 24 hours in the neighborhood without missing a thing. It’s all here — hip brunch spots, funky breweries, and award-winning restaurants. For a quick romp through Corktown and a primer on the multitudes of food and beverage options in the neighborhood, let this itinerary guide your visit. Find options like gluten-free waffles with maple syrup and crushed pistachios at Folk, an all-day cafe located in Corktown. Michelle and Chris Gerard 9 a.m. Breakfast Wake up at Trumbull & Porter , a hotel with trendy art in and outside of the guest rooms, and an outdoor courtyard suited for live music, installations, and a beer garden. From the hotel, head up just the street to the sunny, modern, all-day brunch café, Folk for perfect for a perfect breakfast. The mainstays here include options like potato hash with greens and avocado, refreshing kale salads with vegan cashew dressing, gluten-free Belgian waffles with pistachio crumble, and avocado toast on thick slices of bread. If you need a caffeine kick, there’s an espresso machine. Consider trying a latte flavored with one of Folk’s pastel-hued milk infusions. 10:30 a.m. Break Get some shopping in after breakfast. There’s several funky retailers to choose from in the neighborhood including Mama Coo’s — a stylish vintage and antique shop in nestled in pint-sized space next to Folk. Kitty corner to the block is Hello Records . Drop in and dig through the crates for new or used records from the 1940s through the 2000s. Whether you prefer jazz, soul, funk, blues, or want to discover local Detroit artists, there’s something here for any vinyl collectors. For book lover’s, will not want to miss the multi-level maze that is John K. King Used & Rare Books . Explore the endless stacks for dusty novels and nonfiction volumes. Mudgie’s Deli in Corktown serves big sandwiches and an extensive list of beers and wines from around the world. Michelle and Chris Gerard 1 p.m. Lunch After some shopping, wander over to Mudgie’s Deli anchoring the corner of Porter and Brooklyn Streets for a hearty lunch. This beloved neighborhood establishment serves some of the best sandwiches in Detroit and its beer and wine selections are nothing to sniff at either. People with dietary restrictions can count on vegetarian and vegan options as well as gluten-free bread. Consider ordering the Gutty, a massive sandwich served on a kaiser roll and topped with Milano salami, Sy Ginsberg pastrami and corned beef, bacon, beef brisket, sharp cheddar, romaine lettuce, and garlic mayo. If the weather’s right, kick back with your meal out on the patio. 2:30 p.m. Break Take a break and head over to Meta Physica Wellness . Relax your muscles with a massage or sweat in the sauna. If you want to refresh yourself after your treatment, pick up a smoothie, juice, or elixir from the organic juice bar. Alternatively, consider renting a MoGo bike and touring the neighborhood shops along Michigan Avenue including El Dorado General Store and Mid-Century antiques destination Xavier’s . Don’t forget to ride over to Roosevelt Park and take in the view of Michigan Central Station — a massive, decommissioned train depot. Astro Coffee, located along Michigan Avenue near Roosevelt Park, serves a variety of coffee and espresso drinks as well as sandwiches and fresh pastries. Michelle and Chris Gerard 4 p.m. Coffee After your break, head over to Astro Coffee for some afternoon coffee. This café is well-known for its selection of sandwiches — especially the egg sandwich — and offers baked goods, some of which are vegan. Astro also roasts its own beans. 6:30 p.m. Drinks There’s no shortage of places in Corktown to grab a drink. In the mood for whiskey? Try Two James Distillery , the first licensed distillery in the city since Prohibition. Beer lovers will enjoy Batch Brewing Company on Porter Street. The Sugar House , which helped kick off Detroit’s transformation into a world-class cocktail city, serves excellent renditions of classic drinks and a seasonal house cocktails, too. 8 p.m. Dinner It’s hard to go wrong when it comes to picking a spot for dinner in Corktown. However, don’t leave without checking out chef Kate Williams’ Eater Award-winning restaurant, Lady of the House . Here, the rustic dishes are hearty, so don’t hesitate to share. Start off the meal with oysters served with two styles of sauce. Don’t overlook the carrot “steak” with hollandaise and pistachio, and cauliflower with parmesan sauce, challah, and fennel. The bread is made in-house and served beside soft butter and apple butter. Rotating charcuterie selections are also on the menu, along with lamb loin, prime rib large enough for two, and whole roasted chicken. For dessert, try the popular potato doughnut with chamomile cream, dehydrated yogurt, and sugared thyme. Consider making a reservation at Lady of the House in advance. Alternately, stop by for happy hour drinks and a snack at the bar, which is always open to walk-ins. PJ’s Lager House in Corktown is a pub and live music venue, known for its vegetarian options and late-night sandwiches. Michelle and Chris Gerard 11 p.m. Late-night drinks and entertainment Detroit has an active nightlife, and Corktown is no different. Wind down with some fun at one of the bars in the neighborhood, like PJ’s Lager House , a live music venue and bar with good sandwiches, or the old-school Nancy Whiskey’s Pub with its sprawling patio. Play a game of pool with a glass of whiskey at McShane’s Irish Pub . For live jazz, DJs, and a truly excellent patio, head to the most laid-back wine bar in town — MotorCity Wine .

‘Blue’s Clues’ is back with a new host, new look and new title

‘Blue’s Clues’ is back with a new host, new look and new title Tuesday May 28, 2019 at 10:41 AM
Beloved blue puppy Blue and all her pals are back, but without Steve or Joe. This time, Josh is joining the animated gang to help Blue solve all her clues in “Blue’s Clues & You.”
Joshua Dela Cruz, known for his work in “Disney’s Aladdin” on Broadway, will serve as the newest host with the stamp of approval from original host Steve Burns.
“I had the great honor of being a part of the search for the new host, and I give Josh two thumbs up!” Burns said in an earlier statement. “He can definitely fill my shoes, and the rugby shirt.”
The reboot brings Blue back to TV screens for the first time in 12 years with an updated CGI makeover. But even with some big changes, the good ol’ Thinking Chair, Handy Dandy Notebook and all of Blue’s friends are still there.
The 20-episode series is set to debut in November. Check out the new trailer released by Nick Jr. below.
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More from GateHouse Media:
Kids can earn a free book from Barnes & Noble this summer
‘Sesame Street’ introduces Karli, a new character in foster care
The Library of Congress digitized 70 classic children’s books you can read for free

WIRE Buzz: Creepshow scares up a Scream vet; Gina Rodriguez stays Awake; more

Tag: Marvel
Jeepers creepers! It’s WIRE Buzz time! And what better way to dive into our latest development roundup than with Shudder’s announcement that a Scream alum is joining its TV adaptation of Stephen King and George Romero’s classic horror flick Creepshow .
The new AMC Networks-owned streaming service is adding David “Deputy Dewey” Arquette to its forthcoming anthology series, along with Battlestar Galactica and Lucifer vet Tricia Helfer and actor-comedian Dana Gould, creator of the IFC horror comedy Stan Against Evil . They’ll join a cast that already includes Saw slayer Tobin Bell, The Fog actress Adrienne Barbeau, and Breaking Bad ‘s Giancarlo Esposito.
Shudder’s first foray into long-form original programming, Creepshow will offer up 12 chilling stories throughout its six-episode inaugural season. Arquette will headline “Times Is Tough in Musky Holler,” a chilling story in which the leaders of a town who once ruled through fear and intimidation get a taste of their own medicine.
Helfer will star in “Lydia Layne’s Better Half,” playing a powerful boss who denies a promotion to her protégé and lover but fails to anticipate the fallout.
And Gould will appear in “Skincrawlers,” playing a man who tries a miraculous new weight-loss treatment that has unexpected complications.
Showrunner and makeup effects wiz Greg Nicotero ( The Walking Dead ) also announced that Tom Savini, the legend makeup artist who did all the gory effects on 1982’s Creepshow as well as Dawn of the Dead and Friday the 13th , among others, will direct an episode called “By the Silver Water of Lake Champlain.”
Creepshow the series will premiere on Shudder in 2019.
Jane the Virgin star Gina Rodriguez has signed on to star in Netflix’s post-apocalyptic thriller Awake .
Per Deadline , Rodriguez will play Jill, an ex-soldier with a troubled past who survives a cataclysmic event that’s knocked out all of the globe’s electronics and has taken away humanity’s ability to sleep. As order breaks down and anarchy reigns, Jill finds a sliver of hope — a potential cure that resides in her own daughter, Matilda. But can she save the world and save her daughter before she loses her mind?
Credit: Getty
Mark Raso ( Kodachrome ) is directing from a script he co-wrote with his brother Joseph Raso and Greg Poirer.
Rodriguez’s career is shifting into overdrive. The Golden Globe winner not only starred in Catherine Hardwicke’s action thriller Miss Bala , a remake of the 2011 Mexican film of the same name, but Netflix also greenlit a second season of her animated series Carmen Sandiego , for which she’s expected to don the fedora for a live-action version.
Credit: Netflix
Awake is expected to drop sometime later this year.
Last but not least, Variety reports that Marvel Entertainment has cinched a deal with audiobook experts Dreamscape Media to publish a couple dozen of its classic comic books in audiobook form.
Among the titles? How about The Ultimate Spider-Man , The Ultimate X-Men , X-Men: Codename Wolverine , and Daredevil: The Man Without Fear , highlighting such authors as Len Wein, David Michelinie, Tony Isabella, Marv Wolfman, and Peter David.
Credit: Marvel
Not only that, but the comics will also be distributed via Dreamscape’s Hoopla digital media service, which partners with local libraries. That’s good news for library card holders, as anyone with the Hoopla app whose library has signed up for the service can listen for free.
Of course, Marvel comics are famed for their art as well as their stories, so you’ll just have to use your imagination.

GRAND DAME IN A SMALL CITY

Leisure GRAND DAME IN A SMALL CITY It’s been a long time coming and finally, the Kempinski brand has found the perfect home in Singapore. Here’s what visitors can expect.
M y first encounter with a Kempinski property was on a holiday in Bangkok . I was taken aback by the scale of the Siam Kempinski Hotel and how grand everything was. The driveway immediately made an impression, followed by the lobby’s high ceilings, towering floral arrangements, and sprawling gardens. Once checked in, the staff who accompanied me to my room asked if I wanted my suitcase unpacked and my clothes hung. It was a luxurious touch, but I politely declined.
A few years later, I was reacquainted with this familiar grandeur when The Capitol Kempinski Hotel Singapore finally opened its doors in the latter part of 2018, calling the Capitol Building and Stamford House home.
However, expect grandeur on a smaller, cozier scale because the hotel observes an adaptive reuse approach, working on the existing space within the heritage buildings it occupies. While the lobby’s ceiling is half the height of its Bangkok counterpart, it makes up for it with the tasteful interiors and personable check-in service offered by a Lady in Red – a signature Kempinski brand ambassador.
What is most unique about The Capitol Kempinski Hotel are the guest rooms (157 in total), which feature almost 50 unique configurations. Given the parameters set by the conservation structure, the results are surprising and impressive: Light-filled high-ceiling interiors, plush beds, spacious living areas, and luxurious bathrooms with deep bathtubs.
Expect grandeur on a smaller, cozier scale because the hotel observes an adaptive reuse approach, working on the existing space within the heritage buildings it occupies.
What’s more, a variety of interesting books and décor are carefully placed around the room, as if they’ve always been there. Meanwhile, a Sonos audio system, work desk area, and plentiful USB sockets add a bit of 21st century utilitarianism to an otherwise classic and old world hotel. While most rooms are directly above a main thoroughfare, the hotel does a commendable job of blocking outside noises, ensuring that your stay is as peaceful as possible.
Once you’ve decided to venture out of the comfort of your room, you’ll find a wealth of gastronomic experiences waiting for you, starting with the hotel’s signature restaurant, 15 Stamford by Alvin Leung , where familiar Asian flavors are given a modern spin, courtesy of the Michelin-starred chef.
Recent additions to The Capitol Kempinski Hotel’s restaurants include Frieda, where authentic German cuisine is served alongside various ice-cold German beers on tap. There is also Berthold Delikatessen, which is the perfect spot for lunch or an early dinner with offerings comprised of sandwiches (personal pick would be the signature Dark Rye Sourdough with Pastrami), salads, German-style breads, and pastries.
For more information, visit www.kempinski.com

NWO Insider Killed After This Leak! Final Warning! | Alternative

Detailed plans of the New World Order as leaked to Dr. Dunegan and other doctors in 1969. Share this article and video with everybody to inform humanity. You’ll learn all the deep dark secrets of the NWO in this one. Almost everything discussed is already here! The following video is from the information Dr. Dunegan was told in 1969 with a roomful of doctors. Only the most naive and foolish will not wake up after they hear this presentation! Send it everywhere to destroy the lies of our fake news and government agencies! This might be the final warning for many of you who still can’t believe there are psychopaths running our planet!
In the above video, A New World Order Insider Reveals Entire NWO Plan in 1969! Once this plan was released to the public decades later, I believe this insider was killed shortly afterwards with fast acting cancer as punishment for the information being put out on tape! I’ve been studying the new world order for over 20 years now and I learned a lot just by listening to this information. Everything makes sense once you hear it! This is key information that you, your family and your friends need to know so you are prepared for what is still to come! Most people fully wake up when they hear the testimony of this doctor! It’s so obvious everything he was told was exactly right! Once you learn their plan, you’ll understand the mind control of the fake news, television shows and movies completely. Please learn and share this information with others!
This is amazing information from Dr. Lawrence Dunegan who was invited to attend a lecture by Dr. Richard Day (head of Planned Parenthood) in 1969. Dr. Day told this room of about 80-90 doctors all about the changes they would witness in their lifetime as a result of “The Order” or as we know it now as the “New World Order” or Illuminati. Dr Day told the doctors that he was free to speak at this time because everything was in place and nobody could stop them now!
Recording devices were not allowed in the room and taking notes was not allowed. Luckily, Dr. Dunegan had a near photographic memory and took good notes when he got home from the lecture. The notes stayed in his desk for 20 years until he pulled them out and decided he needed to get the information out to as many as possible by making audio tapes of the information in 1989.
Dr Day stated at one point that he would be in real trouble if the information he was telling them got out to the general public. That’s why taking notes was prohibited and and recording devices were not allowed in the room. Was it a coincidence that Dr. Day died shortly after Dr. Dunegan began distributing this information on audio tapes in 1989? I believe they killed him in retaliation for the information he released. As Dr. Day admitted during the lecture there were many ways to kill people with diseases or even artificial heart attacks.
After the lecture was completed, Dr. Day gave a hypnotic suggestion to the entire room that they would probably forget everything they heard today but would be ready for the coming changes. When Dr. Dunegan asked some of his friends that were in the room what they thought of the lecture, none of them could tell him what it was about!
Here are just some of the topics covered in this video created from Dr. Dunegan’s audio tapes about the plans of the new world order.
CANCER AS A MEANS OF POPULATION CONTROL
He said, “We can cure almost every cancer right now. (this was said in 1969!) Information is on file in the Rockefeller Institute, if it’s ever decided that it should be released. But consider – if people stop dying of cancer, how rapidly we would become overpopulated. You may as well die of cancer as something else.”
Efforts at cancer treatment would be geared more toward comfort than toward cure. There was some statement ultimately the cancer cures which were being hidden in the Rockefeller Institute would come to light because independent researchers might bring them out, despite these efforts to suppress them. But at least for the time being, letting people die of cancer was a good thing to do because it would slow down the problem of overpopulation.
Note: This is why effective natural treatments for viruses, bacteria and other pathogens are never discussed by Rockefeller trained Medical Doctors (M.D.’s) They will never use or recommend effective and inexpensive products such as APeX which combines silver with oxygen as a highly effective AntiViral, AntiBacterial and AntiPathogen! They WANT you sick and dying! Our medical system is a giant SCAM!
PLANNING THE CONTROL OVER MEDICINE
The next topic is Medicine. There would be profound changes in the practice of medicine. Overall, medicine would be much more tightly controlled. The observation was made, ”Congress is not going to go along with national health insurance. That (in 1969), he said, “is now, abundantly evident. But it’s not necessary. We have other ways to control health care.”
These would come about more gradually, but all health care delivery would come under tight control. Medical care would be closely connected to work. If you don’t work or can’t work, you won’t have access to medical care. The days of hospitals giving away free care would gradually wind down, to where it was virtually non-existent. Costs would be forced up so that people won’t be able to afford to go without insurance. People pay… you pay for it, you’re entitled to it.
It was only subsequently that I began to realize the extent to which you would not be paying for it. Your medical care would be paid for by others. And therefore you would gratefully accept, on bended knee, what was offered to you as a privilege. Your role being responsible for your own care would be diminished.
As an aside here – this is not something that was developed at this time… I didn’t understand it at the time — as an aside, the way this works, everybody’s made dependent on insurance. And if you don’t have insurance then you pay directly; the cost of your care is enormous. The insurance company, however, paying for your care, does not pay that same amount. If you are charged, say, $600 on your part, they pay $300 or $400. And that differential in billing has the desired effect: It enables the insurance company to pay for that which you could never pay for. They get a discount that’s unavailable to you. When you see your bill you’re grateful that the insurance company could do that. And in this way you are dependent, and virtually required to have insurance.
The whole billing is fraudulent.
Anyhow, continuing on now… access to hospitals would be tightly controlled. Identification would be needed to get into the building. The security in and around hospitals would be established and gradually increased so that nobody without identification could get in or move around inside the building. Theft of hospital equipment, things like typewriters and microscopes and so forth would be “allowed” and exaggerated; reports of it would be exaggerated so that this would be the excuse needed to establish the need for strict security, until people got used to it. And anybody moving about in a hospital would be required to wear an identification badge with photograph and . . telling why he was there . . employee or lab technician or visitor or whatever.
This is to be brought in gradually — getting everybody used to the idea of identifying themselves — until it was just accepted. This need for ID to move about would start in small ways: hospitals, some businesses, but gradually expand to include everybody in all places! It was observed that hospitals can be used to confine people… for the treatment of criminals. This did not mean, necessarily, medical treatment. At that… at that time, I did not know the word “Psycho-Prison” as in the Soviet Union, but without trying to recall all the details, basically, he was describing the use of hospitals both for treating the sick and for confinement of criminals for reasons other than the medical well-being of the criminal. The definition of criminal was not given.
Note: It was only in the last 20 years that I realized our entire medical system is a total fraud. The make you pay insurace because their rates or so high, if you don’t get the insurance, they wipe you out with one major health issue. Then they don’t actually cure your illness becaues they give you Big Pharma solutions that don’t work and make it worse. ObamaCare FORCED you to pay for their garbage health care plans that were of course a total ripoff! Trump stopped this mandate thankfully!
ELIMINATION OF PRIVATE DOCTORS
The image of the doctor would change. No longer would he be seen as an individual professional in service to individual patients. But the doctor would be gradually recognized as a highly skilled technician… and his job would change. The job is to include things like executions by lethal injection. The image of the doctor being a powerful, independent person would have to be changed. And he went on to say, “Doctors are making entirely too much money. They should advertise like any other product.”
Lawyers would be advertising too. Keep in mind, this was an audience of doctors being addressed by a doctor. And it was interesting that he would make some rather insulting statements to his audience without fear of antagonizing us. The solo practitioner would become a thing of the past. A few die-hards might try to hold out, but most doctors would be employed by an institution of one kind or another. Group practice would be encouraged, corporations would be encouraged, and then once the corporate image of medical care… as this gradually became more and more acceptable, doctors would more and more become employees rather than independent contractors. And along with that, of course, unstated but necessary, is the employee serves his employer, not his patient.
So that’s… we’ve already seen quite a lot of that in the last 20 years. And apparently more on the horizon. The term HMO was not used at that time, but as you look at HMOs you see this is the way that medical care is being taken over since the National Health Insurance approach did not get through the Congress. A few die-hard doctors may try to make a go of it; remaining in solo practice, remaining independent, which, parenthetically, is me. But they would suffer a great loss of income. They’d be able to scrape by, maybe, but never really live comfortably as would those who were willing to become employees of the system. Ultimately, there would be no room at all for the solo practitioner, after the system is entrenched.
Note: I’ve read articles where ObamaCare has forced many doctors to quit or retire early. It’s clearly become more rare for a dotor to be able to operate on his own due to the ridiculous insurance rates and government regulation.
NEW DIFFICULT TO DIAGNOSE AND UNTREATABLE DISEASES
Next heading to talk about is HEALTH & DISEASE. He said there would be new diseases to appear which had not ever been seen before. Would be very difficult to diagnose and be untreatable — at least for a long time. No elaboration was made on this, but I remember, not long after hearing this presentation, when I had a puzzling diagnosis to make, I would be wondering, “Is this … was what he was talking about? Is this a case of what he was talking about?”. Some years later, as AIDS ultimately developed, I think AIDS was at least one example of what he was talking about. I now think that AIDS probably was a manufactured disease.
Note: Clearly Aids was man made. Morgellons is like something out of a science fiction movie where fibers literally grow out of your skin that seem to be nano tech. Clearly many are cooking up new diseases in the labs for the new world order. I’m sure that only those at the top of the NWO are given the cures to these conditions while the rest of us kept in the dark.
“PEOPLE WILL HAVE TO GET USED TO CHANGE . . .”
Somewhere in the introductory remarks he insisted that nobody have a tape recorder and that nobody take notes, which for a professor was a very remarkable kind of thing to expect from an audience. Something in his remarks suggested that there could be negative repercussions against him if his… if it became widely known what he was about to say to… our group… if it became widely known that he spilled the beans, so to speak.
When I heard that, first I thought maybe that was sort of an ego trip, somebody enhancing his own importance. But as the revelations unfolded, I began to understand why he might have had some concern about not having it widely known what was said, although this… although this was a fairly public forum where he was speaking, [where the] remarks were delivered. But, nonetheless, he asked that no notes be taken… no tape recording be used – suggesting there might be some personal danger to himself if these revelations were widely publicized.
Again, as the remarks began to unfold, and I saw the rather outrageous things that were said – at that time they certainly seemed outrageous — I made it a point to try to remember as much of what he said as I could, and during the subsequent weeks and months and years, to connect my recollections to simple events around me, both to aid my memory for the future in case I wanted to do what I’m doing now – record this. And also, to try to maintain a perspective on what would be developing, if indeed, it followed the predicted pattern – which it has!
At this point, so that I don’t forget to include it later, I’ll just include some statements that were made from time to time throughout the presentation… just having a general bearing on the whole presentation. One of the statements was having to do with change. People get used . . the statement was, “People will have to get used to the idea of change, so used to change, that they’ll be expecting change. Nothing will be permanent.”
This often came out in the context of a society of… where people seemed to have no roots or moorings, but would be passively willing to accept change simply because it was all they had ever known. This was sort of in contrast to generations of people up until this time where certain things you expected to be, and remain in place as reference points for your life. So change was to be brought about, change was to be anticipated and expected, and accepted, no questions asked. Another comment that was made . . from time to time during the presentation was, “People are too trusting. People don’t ask the right questions.”
Sometimes, being too trusting was equated with being too dumb. But sometimes when… when he would say that and say, “People don’t ask the right questions,” it was almost with a sense of regret, as if he were uneasy with what he was part of, and wished that people would challenge it and maybe not be so trusting.
Note: Please take note of the comment “People Are Too Trusting”. The new world order is this far along because many of you reading this article were too trusting! You believe the fake news on TV and you didn’t seek out other sources for your information like beforeitsnews.com which destroys the lies of the mainstream and even the gatekeepers of the alternative media (“tip of the spear” people in Austin Texas) that has hidden many things from you that you will only learn about from our Vets and patriots.
THE REAL AND THE “STATED” GOALS
Another comment that was repeated from time to time… this particularly in relation to changing laws and customs… and specific changes… he said, “Everything has two purposes. One is the ostensible purpose which will make it acceptable to people; and second, is the real purpose which would further the goals of establishing the new system and having it.”
Frequently he would say, “There is just no other way. There’s just no other way!”
This seemed to come as a sort of an apology, particularly when… at the conclusion of describing some particularly offensive changes. For example, the promotion of drug addiction which we’ll get into shortly.
Note: We all know how the game works, they CREATE the problem, then they offer the solution to this problem they created. For example I have whistleblowers who claim steadfastly that Nobody Died at Sandy Hook and if this is indeeed true then they CREATED this event because it was a drill. Then they said they had to take your guns to protect the children! The REAL purpose is always to take your guns as Doctor Dunegan states later.
POPULATION CONTROL
He was very active with population control groups, the population control movement, and population control was really the entry point into specifics following the introduction. He said the population is growing too fast. Numbers of people living at any one time on the planet must be limited or we will run out of space to live. We will outgrow our food supply and we will over-pollute the world with our waste.
Note: They put things to sterilize us in the water, food, vaccines and of course they encourage homosexuality and abortion. Russia pays couples to have children while NWO USA pays to kill the babies!
PERMISSION TO HAVE BABIES
People won’t be allowed to have babies just because they want to or because they are careless. Most families would be limited to two. Some people would be allowed only one, and the outstanding person or persons might be selected and allowed to have three. But most people would [be] allowed to have only two babies. That’s because the zero population growth [rate] is 2.1 children per completed family. So something like every 10th family might be allowed the privilege of the third baby.
To me, up to this point, the word “population control” primarily connoted limiting the number of babies to be born. But this remark, about what people would be “allowed” and then what followed, made it quite clear that when you hear “population control” that means more than just controlling births. It means control of every endeavor of an entire… of the entire world population; a much broader meaning to that term than I had ever attached to it before hearing this. As you listen and reflect back on some of the things you hear, you will begin to recognize how one aspect dovetails with other aspects in terms of controlling human endeavors.
Note: While this hasn’t quite gotten to this point here in the USA yet, we already see that it’s been done in China and since they are destroying our economy and making it difficult for people to support children financially, the birth rate has dropped dramatically inside the US.
REDIRECTING THE PURPOSE OF SEX – SEX WITHOUT REPRODUCTION AND REPRODUCTION WITHOUT SEX
Well, from population control, the natural next step then was sex. He said sex must be separated from reproduction. Sex is too pleasurable, and the urges are too strong, to expect people to give it up. Chemicals in food and in the water supply to reduce the sex drive is not practical. The strategy then would be not to diminish sex activity, but to increase sex activity, but in such a way that people won’t be having babies.
Note: This is being shown on the TV shows, Movies and all entertainment. Very rarely is sex talked about for the purpose of reproduction, it’s mostly just for the pleasure and of course we are now making babies without reproduction.
CONTRACEPTION UNIVERSALLY AVAILABLE TO ALL
And the first consideration then here was contraception. Contraception would be very strongly encouraged, and it would be connected so closely in people’s minds with sex, that they would automatically think contraception when they were thinking or preparing for sex. And contraception would be made universally available. Nobody wanting contraception would be… find that they were unavailable.
Contraceptives would be displayed much more prominently in drug stores, right up with the cigarettes and chewing gum. Out in the open, rather than hidden under the counter where people would have to ask for them and maybe be embarrassed. This kind of openness was a way of suggesting that contraceptions . . that contraceptives are just as much a part of life as any other items sold in the store. And, contraceptives would be advertised. And, contraceptives would be dispensed in the schools in association with sex education!
Note: Children are given condoms in school in many cities now. And of couse we all know that birth control is all out in the open now whereas in 1969 it was behind the counter.
SEX EDUCATION AS A TOOL OF WORLD GOVERNMENT
The sex education was to get kids interested early, making the connection between sex and the need for contraception early in their lives, even before they became very active. At this point I was recalling some of my teachers, particularly in high school and found it totally unbelievable to think of them agreeing, much less participating in, distributing of contraceptives to students. But, that only reflected my lack of understanding of how these people operate. That was before the school-based clinic programs got started.
Many, many cities in the United States by this time have already set up school-based clinics which are primarily contraception, birth control, population control clinics. The idea then is that the connection between sex and contraception introduced and reinforced in school would carry over into marriage. Indeed, if young people – when they matured – decided to get married, marriage itself would be diminished in importance. He indicated some recognition that most people probably would want to be married… but that this certainly would not be any longer considered to be necessary for sexual activity.
Note: They are actually teaching homosexuality and encouraging it to the children in many schools now! They are even encouraging girls and boys to kiss each other and promoting children to have sex.
TAX FUNDED ABORTION AS POPULATION CONTROL
No surprise then, that the next item was abortion. And this, now back in 1969, four years before Roe vs. Wade. He said, “Abortion will no longer be a crime. Abortion will be accepted as normal” , and would be paid for by taxes for people who could not pay for their own abortions. Contraceptives would be made available by tax money so that nobody would have to do without contraceptives. If school sex programs would lead to more pregnancies in children, that was really seen as no problem. Parents who think they are opposed to abortion on moral or religious grounds will change their minds when it is their own child who is pregnant. So this will help overcome opposition to abortion. Before long, only a few die-hards will still refuse to see abortion as acceptable, and they won’t matter anymore.
Note: For the first time in history the US government is now using your tax payer money to kill babies – ObamaCare – the biggest rippoff in our history.
ENCOURAGING HOMOSEXUALITY. SEX, ANYTHING GOES
Homosexuality also was to be encouraged. ”People will be given permission to be homosexual.”
That’s the way it was stated. They won’t have to hide it. And elderly people will be encouraged to continue to have active sex lives into the very old ages, just as long as they can. Everyone will be given permission to have sex, to enjoy however they want. Anything goes. This is the way it was put. And, I remember thinking, “how arrogant for this individual, or whoever he represents, to feel that they can give or withhold permission for people to do things!” But that was the terminology that was used.
In this regard, clothing was mentioned. Clothing styles would be made more stimulating and provocative. Recall back in 1969 was the time of the mini skirt, when those mini- skirts were very, very high and revealing. He said, ”It is not just the amount of skin that is exposed that makes clothing sexually seductive, but other, more subtle things are often suggestive,”
. . things like movement, and the cut of clothing, and the kind of fabric, the positioning of accessories on the clothing. ”If a woman has an attractive body, why should she not show it?” was one of the statements.
There was not detail on what was meant by “provocative clothing,” but since that time if you watched the change in clothing styles, blue jeans are cut in a way that they’re more tight-fitting in the crotch. They form wrinkles. Wrinkles are essentially arrows. Lines which direct one’s vision to certain anatomic areas. And, this was around the time of the “burn your bra” activity. He indicated that a lot of women should not go without a bra. They need a bra to be attractive, so instead of banning bras and burning them, bras would come back. But they would be thinner and softer allowing more natural movement. It was not specifically stated, but certainly a very thin bra is much more revealing of the nipple and what else is underneath, than the heavier bras that were in style up to that time.
Technology. Earlier he said . . sex and reproduction would be separated. You would have sex without reproduction and then technology was reproduction without sex. This would be done in the laboratory. He indicated that already, much, much research was underway about making babies in the laboratory. There was some elaboration on that, but I don’t remember the details, how much of that technology has come to my attention since that time. I don’t remember . . I don’t remember in a way that I can distinguish what was said from what I subsequently have learned as general medical information.
Note: I remember growing up there was only one television show that had a gay character in it called “Soap”, now you’ll see it everywhere. Again, the US promotes homosexuality while Russia keeps it away from TV and the chidren.
FAMILIES TO DIMINISH IN IMPORTANCE
Families would be limited in size. We already alluded to not being allowed more than two children. Divorce would be made easier and more prevalent. Most people who marry will marry more than once. More people will not marry. Unmarried people would stay in hotels and even live together. That would be very common – nobody would even ask questions about it. It would be widely accepted as no different from married people being together.
More women will work outside the home. More men will be transferred to other cities, and in their jobs, more men would travel. Therefore, it would be harder for families to stay together. This would tend to make the marriage relationship less stable and, therefore, tend to make people less willing to have babies. And, the extended families would be smaller, and more remote. Travel would be easier, less expensive, for a while , so that people who did have to travel would feel they could get back to their families… not that they were abruptly being made remote from their families.
But one of the net effects of easier divorce laws combined with the promotion of travel, and transferring families from one city to another, was to create instability in the families. If both husband and wife are working and one partner gets transferred the other one may not be easily transferred. So one either keeps his or her job and stays behind while the other leaves, or else gives up the job and risks not finding employment in the new location. Rather a diabolical approach to this whole thing!
Note: I was fortunate to have my parents married for over 50 years before my father died. Today it’s very rare for a child to grow up with only one set of parents. Divorce is almost promoted through media as a solution.
EUTHANASIA AND THE “DEMISE PILL”
Everybody has a right to live only so long. The old are no longer useful. They become a burden. You should be ready to accept death. Most people are. An arbitrary age limit could be established. After all, you have a right to only so many steak dinners, so many orgasms, and so many good pleasures in life. And after you have had enough of them and you’re no longer productive, working, and contributing, then you should be ready to step aside for the next generation.
Some things that would help people realize that they had lived long enough, he mentioned several of these… I don’t remember them all… here are a few: Use of very pale printing ink on forms that people… are necessary… to fill out, so that older people wouldn’t be able to read the pale ink as easily and would need to go to younger people for help. Automobile traffic patterns – there would be more high-speed traffic lanes . . traffic patterns that would . . that older people with their slower reflexes would have trouble dealing with and thus, lose some of their independence.
Note: ObamaCare was sold by Bill Gates as saying if we don’t pay all that money to keep Granny alive for the last 6 months we can hire 10 new teachers! Magazines such as Newseek have run cover stories such as “The Case for Killing Granny!” Clearly they want to kill as many old people as possible and will do so by not giving them treatment through ObamaCare.
LIMITING ACCESS TO AFFORDABLE MEDICAL CARE MAKES ELIMINATING THE ELDERLY EASIER
A big item – [that] was elaborated at some length – was the cost of medical care would be burdensomely high. Medical care would be connected very closely with one’s work, but also would be made very, very high in cost so that it would simply be unavailable to people beyond a certain time. And unless they had a remarkably rich, supporting family, they would just have to do without care.
And the idea was that if everybody says, “Enough! What a burden it is on the young to try to maintain the old people,” then the young would become agreeable to helping Mom and Dad along the way, provided this was done humanely and with dignity. And then the real example was – there could be like a nice, farewell party, a real celebration. Mom and Dad had done a good job. And then after the party’s over they take the “demise pill.”
Note: Again ObamaCare!
INDUCING HEART ATTACKS AS A FORM OF ASSASSINATION
Another very interesting thing was heart attacks. He said, “There is now a way to simulate a real heart attack. It can be used as a means of assassinates.”
Only a very skilled pathologist who knew exactly what to look for at an autopsy, could distinguish this from the real thing. I thought that was a very surprising and shocking thing to hear from this particular man at that particular time. This, and the business of the cancer cure, really still stand out sharply in my memory, because they were so shocking and, a that time, seemed to me out of character.
Note: Andrew Breitbart?
He then went on to talk about nutrition and exercise, sort of in the same framework. People would not have to… people would have to eat right and exercise right to live as long as before. Most won’t. This, in the connection of nutrition, there was no specific statement that I can recall as to particular nutrients that would be either inadequate or in excess. In retrospect, I tend to think he meant high salt diets and high fat diets would predispose toward high blood pressure and premature arteriosclerotic heart disease. And that if people who were too dumb or too lazy to exercise as they should then their dietary… their circulating fats go up and predispose to disease.
And he said something about diet information — about proper diet — would be widely available, but most people – particularly stupid people, who had no right to continue living anyway – they would ignore the advice and just go on and eat what was convenient and tasted good. There were some other unpleasant things said about food. I just can’t recall what they were. But I do remember of… having reflections about wanting to plant a garden in the backyard to get around whatever these contaminated foods would be. I regret I don’t remember the details… the rest of this… about nutrition and hazardous nutrition.
With regard to Exercise. He went on to say that more people would be exercising more, especially running, because everybody can run. You don’t need any special equipment or place. You can run wherever you are. As he put it, “people will be running all over the place.” And in this vein, he pointed out how supply produces demand. And this was in reference to athletic clothing and equipment. As this would be made more widely available and glamorized, particularly as regards running shoes, this would stimulate people to develop an interest in running and – as part of a whole sort of public propaganda campaign – people would be encouraged then to buy the attractive sports equipment and to get into exercise.
Again… well in connection with nutrition he also mentioned that public eating places would rapidly increase. That… this had a connection with the family too. As more and more people eat out, eating at home would become less important. People would be less dependent on their kitchens at home. And then this also connected to convenience foods being made widely available – things like you could pop into the microwave. Whole meals would be available pre-fixed. And of course, we’ve now seen this… and some pretty good ones.
Note: Think of how rapidly fast food has grown in the last 30 years. Before it used to be a treat for a kid to go out to McDonalds once in a while but now many familes eat it daily.
But this whole different approach to eating out and to previously prepared meals being eaten in the home was predicted at that time to be brought about – convenience foods. The convenience foods would be part of the hazards. Anybody who was lazy enough to want the convenience foods rather than fixing his own also had better be energetic enough to exercise. Because if he was too lazy to exercise and too lazy to fix his own food, then he didn’t deserve to live very long.
This was all presented as sort of a moral judgment about people and what they should do with their energies. People who are smart, who would learn about nutrition, and who are disciplined enough to eat right and exercise right are better people – and the kind you want to live longer.
EDUCATION AS A TOOL FOR ACCELERATING THE ONSET OF PUBERTY AND EVOLUTION
Somewhere along in here there was also something about accelerating the onset of puberty. And this was said in connection with health, and later in connection with education, and connecting to accelerating the process of evolutionary change. There was a statement that ”we think that we can push evolution faster and in the direction we want it to go.”
I remember this only as a general statement. I don’t recall if any details were given beyond that.
BLENDING ALL RELIGIONS — THE OLD RELIGIONS WILL HAVE TO GO
Another area of discussion was RELIGION. This is an avowed atheist speaking. And he said, “Religion is not necessarily bad. A lot of people seem to need religion, with it’s mysteries and rituals – so they will have religion.”
But the major religions of today have to be changed because they are not compatible with the changes to come. The old religions will have to go. Especially Christianity. Once the Roman Catholic Church is brought down, the rest of Christianity will follow easily. Then a new religion can be accepted for use all over the world. It will incorporate something from all of the old ones to make it more easy for people to accept it, and feel at home in it. Most people won’t be too concerned with religion. They will realize that they don’t need it.
CHANGING THE BIBLE THROUGH REVISIONS OF KEY WORDS
In order to do this, the Bible will be changed. It will be rewritten to fit the new religion. Gradually, key words will be replaced with new words having various shades of meaning. Then, the meaning attached to the new word can be close to the old word. And as time goes on, other shades of meaning of that word can be emphasized, and then gradually that word replaced with another word.
I don’t know if I’m making that clear. But the idea is that everything in Scripture need not be rewritten, just key words replaced by other words. And the variability in meaning attached to any word can be used as a tool to change the entire meaning of Scripture, and therefore make it acceptable to this new religion. Most people won’t know the difference; and this was another one of the times where he said, ”the few who do notice the difference won’t be enough to matter.”
Note: Every year there is a new version of the Bible. There is even a Klingon (from Star Trek) version of the Bible. You can’t make a new version unless at least 10% of the Bible is changed! Clearly they are distorting God’s word as fast as they can. That’s why it’s important to get a King James Bible as that is the most accurate one and does not keep changing. The older the better!
THE CHURCHES WILL HELP
Then followed one of the most surprising statements of the whole presentation: He said, ”some of you probably think the churches won’t stand for this,” and he went on to say, “The churches will help us!”
There was no elaboration on this; it was unclear just what he had in mind when he said, “the churches will help us!” In retrospect, I think some of us now can understand what he might have meant at that time. I recall then only of thinking, “no they won’t!” and remembering our Lord’s words where he said to Peter, “Thou art Peter and upon this rock I will build my Church, and gates of Hell will not prevail against it.”
So… yes, some people in the churches might help. And in the subsequent 20 years we’ve seen how some people in churches have helped. But we also know that our Lord’s Words will stand, and the gates of Hell will NOT prevail.
Note: Of course the churches are helping the NWO. There are probably only a handful teaching anything about the new world order. Kent Hovind’s church was teaching about the new world order and the govenment put him in prison on a bogus tax charge.
RESTRUCTURING EDUCATION AS A TOOL OF INDOCTRINATION
Another area of discussion was Education. And one of the things in connection with education that I remember connecting with what he said about religion, was – in addition to changing the Bible – he said that the classics in Literature would be changed. I seem to recall Mark Twain’s writings was given as one example. But he said, the casual reader reading a revised version of a classic would never even suspect that there was any change. And, somebody would have to go through word by word to even recognize that any change was made in these classics; the changes would be so subtle. But the changes would be such as to promote the acceptability of the new system.
MORE TIME IN SCHOOLS, BUT THEY “WOULDN’T LEARN ANYTHING.”
As regards education, he indicated that kids would spend more time in schools, but in many schools they wouldn’t learn anything. They’ll learn some things, but not as much as formerly. Better schools in better areas with better people – their kids will learn more. In the better schools, learning would be accelerated. And this is another time where he said, “We think we can push evolution.”
By pushing kids to learn more, he seemed to be suggesting that their brains would evolve, that their offspring would evolve – sort of pushing evolution – where kids would learn and be more intelligent at a younger age. As if this pushing would alter their physiology. Overall, schooling would be prolonged. This meant prolonged through the school year. I’m not sure what he said about a long school day, I do remember he said that school was planned to go all summer, that the summer school vacation would become a thing of the past. Not only for schools, but for other reasons. People would begin to think of vacation times year round, not just in the summer.
For most people, it would take longer to complete their education. To get what originally had been in a bachelor’s program would now require advanced degrees and more schooling. So that a lot of school time would be just wasted time. Good schools would become more competitive. I inferred when he said that, that he was including all schools – elementary up through college – but I don’t recall whether he said that.
Students would have to decide at a younger age what they would want to study and get onto their track early, if they would qualify. It would be harder to change to another field of study once you get started. Studies would be concentrated in much greater depth, but narrowed. You wouldn’t have access to material in other fields, outside your own area of study, without approval. This seem to be more… where he talked about limited access to other fields… I seem to recall that as being more at the college level, high school and college level, perhaps. People would be very specialized in their own area of expertise. But they won’t be able to get a broad education and won’t be able to understand what is going on overall.
CONTROLLING WHO HAS ACCESS TO INFORMATION
He was already talking about computers in education, and at that time he said anybody who wanted computer access, or access to books that were not directly related to their field of study would have to have a very good reason for so doing. Otherwise, access would be denied.
SCHOOLS AS THE HUB OF THE COMMUNITY
Another angle was that the schools would become more important in people’s overall life. Kids in addition to their academics, would have to get into school activities unless they wanted to feel completely out of it. But spontaneous activities among kids – the thing that came to my mind when I heard this was sandlot football and sandlot baseball teams that we worked up as kids growing up. I said the kids wanting any activities outside of school would be almost forced to get them through the school. There would be few opportunities outside.
Now the pressures of the accelerated academic program, the accelerated demands, where kids would feel they had to be part of something – one or another athletic club or some school activity – these pressures he recognized would cause some students to burn out. He said, “the smartest ones will learn how to cope with pressures and to survive. There will be some help available to students in handling stress, but the unfit won’t be able to make it. They will then move on to other things.”
In this connection, and later on in the connection with drug abuse and alcohol abuse, he indicated that psychiatric services to help would be increased dramatically. In all the pushing for achievement, it was recognized that many people would need help, and the people worth keeping around would be able to accept and benefit from that help, and still be super-achievers. Those who could not would fall by the wayside and therefore were sort of dispensable – “expendable” – I guess is the word I want.
Education would be lifelong. Adults would be going to school. There’ll always be new information that adults must have to keep up. When you can’t keep up anymore, you’re too old. This was another way of letting older people know that the time had come for them to move on and take the demise pill. If you get too tired to keep up with your education, or you got too old to learn new information, then this was a signal – you begin to prepare to get ready to step aside.
SOME BOOKS WOULD JUST DISAPPEAR FROM THE LIBRARIES
In addition to revising the classics, which I alluded to awhile ago – with revising the Bible, he said, ”some books would just disappear from the libraries.”
This was in the vein that some books contain information or contain ideas that should not be kept around. And therefore, those books would disappear. I don’t remember exactly if he said how this was to be accomplished. But I seem to recall carrying away this idea that this would include thefts. That certain people would be designated to go to certain libraries and pick up certain books and just get rid of them. Not necessarily as a matter of policy – just simply steal it. Further down the line, not everybody will be allowed to own books. And some books NOBODY will be allowed to own.
CHANGING LAWS
Another area of discussion was laws that would be changed. At that time a lot of States had blue laws about Sunday sales, certain Sunday activities. He said the blue laws would all be repealed. Gambling laws would be repealed or relaxed, so that gambling would be increased. He indicated then that governments would get into gambling. We’ve had a lot of state lotteries pop up around the country since then. And, at the time, we were already being told that would be the case. “Why should all that gambling money be kept in private hands when the State would benefit from it?” was the rational behind it. But people should be able to gamble if they want to. So it would become a civil activity, rather than a private, or illegal activity.
Bankruptcy laws would be changed. I don’t remember the details, but just that they would be changed. And I know subsequent to that time they have been. Antitrust laws would be changed, or be interpreted differently, or both. In connection with the changing anti-trust laws, there was some statement that in a sense, competition would be increased. But this would be increased competition within otherwise controlled circumstances. So it’s not a free competition. I recall of having the impression that it was like competition but within members of a club. There would be nobody outside the club would be able to compete. Sort of like teams competing within a professional league… if you’re the NFL or the American or National Baseball Leagues, you compete within the league but the league is all in agreement on what the rules of competition are – not a really free competition.
ENCOURAGEMENT OF DRUG ABUSE TO CREATE A JUNGLE ATMOSPHERE
Drug use would be increased. Alcohol use would be increased. Law enforcement efforts against drugs would be increased. On first hearing that, it sounded like a contradiction. Why increase drug abuse and simultaneously increase law enforcement against drug abuse? But the idea is that, in part, the increased availability of drugs would provide a sort of law of the jungle whereby the weak and the unfit would be selected out. There was a statement made at the time: ”Before the earth was overpopulated, there was a law of the jungle where only the fittest survived.”
You had to be able to protect yourself against the elements and wild animals and disease. And if you were fit, you survived. But now we’ve become so civilized – we’re over civilized – and the unfit are enabled to survive, only at the expense of those who are more fit. And the abusive drugs then, would restore, in a certain sense, the law of the jungle, and selection of the fittest for survival. News about drug abuse and law enforcement efforts would tend to keep drugs in the public consciousness. And would also tend to reduce this unwarranted American complacency that the world is a safe place, and a nice place.
Note: Our government brings in the drugs but puts you in jail for using them. Since the 70s they have put 8 times more people in prison than ever in history and that’s why the US has the largest prison population of any country in the world. This was part of the plan as Dr. Dunegan talked about. To make sure that you were guilty of something!
ALCOHOL ABUSE
The same thing would happen with alcohol. Alcohol abuse would be both promoted and demoted at the same time. The vulnerable and the weak would respond to the promotions and, therefore, use and abuse more alcohol. Drunk driving would become more of a problem; and stricter rules about driving under the influence would be established so that more and more people would lose their privilege to drive.
RESTRICTIONS ON TRAVEL
This also had connection with something we’ll get to later about overall restrictions on travel. Not everybody should be free to travel the way they do now in the United States. People don’t have a need to travel that way. It’s a privilege! It was a kind of a high-handed way it was put. Again, much more in the way of psychological services would be made available to help those who got hooked on drugs and alcohol.
The idea being, that in order to promote this – drug and alcohol abuse to screen out some of the unfit people who are otherwise pretty good – would also be subject to getting hooked. And if they were really worth their salt they would have enough sense to seek psychological counseling and to benefit from it. So this was presented as sort of a redeeming value on the part of the planners. It was as if he were saying, ”you think we’re bad in promoting these evil things — but look how nice we are – we’re also providing a way out!”
Note: Just in the last 5 years we are hearing about massive hassles at the borders and airports. They have made air travel so intrusive through the ridiculous TSA that many people don’t travel as much anymore. Also as they have destroyed the eocnomy that have decreased travel because many can’t afford to travel much at all.
THE NEED FOR MORE JAILS, AND USING HOSPITALS AS JAILS
More jails would be needed. Hospitals could serve as jails. Some new hospital construction would be designed so as to make them adaptable to jail-like use.
CHANGE
Change, nothing is permanent. Streets would be rerouted, renamed. Areas you had not seen in a while would become unfamiliar. Among other things, this would contribute to older people feeling that it was time to move on, they feel they couldn’t even keep up with the changes in areas that were once familiar. Buildings would be allowed to stand empty and deteriorate, and streets would be allowed to deteriorate in certain localities. The purpose of this was to provide the jungle, the depressed atmosphere for the unfit. Somewhere in this same connection he mentioned that buildings and bridges would be made so that they would collapse after a while; there would be more accidents involving airplanes and railroads and automobiles. All of this to contribute to the feeling of insecurity, that nothing was safe.
Not too long after this presentation, and I think one or two even before in the area where I live, we had some newly constructed bridge to break; another newly constructed bridge defect discovered before it broke, and I remember reading just scattered incidents around the country where shopping malls would fall in – right where they were filled with shoppers. And I remember that one of the shopping malls in our area, the first building I’d ever been in where you could feel this vibration throughout the entire building when there were a lot of people in there; and I remember wondering at that time whether this shopping mall was one of the buildings he was talking about. Talking to construction people and architects about it they would say, “Oh no, that’s good when the building vibrates like that. That means it’s flexible, not rigid.” Well… maybe so. We’ll wait and see.
Other areas there would be well-maintained. Not every part of the city would be slums. There would be the created slums and other areas well-maintained. Those people able to leave the slums for better areas then would learn to better appreciate the importance of human accomplishment. This meant that if they left the jungle and came to civilization, so to speak, they could be proud of their own accomplishments that they made it. There was no related sympathy for those who were left behind in the jungle of drugs and deteriorating neighborhoods. Then a statement that was kind of surprising: “We think we can effectively limit crime to the slum areas, so it won’t be spread heavily into better areas.”
GLOBAL INTERDEPENDENCE “TO CREATE A NEW STRUCTURE, YOU FIRST HAVE TO TEAR DOWN THE OLD”
American industry came under discussion – it was the first that I’d heard the term GLOBAL INTERDEPENDENCE or that notion. The stated plan was that different parts of the world would be assigned different roles of industry and commerce in a unified global system. The continued pre-eminence of the United States and the relative independence and self-sufficiency of the United States would have to be changed. This was one of the several times that he said in order to create a new structure, you first have to tear down the old, and American industry was one example of that. Our system would have to be curtailed in order to give other countries a chance to build their industries, because otherwise they would not be able to compete against the United States. And this was especially true of our heavy industries that would be cut back while the same industries were being developed in other countries, notably Japan.
PATRIOTISM WOULD GO DOWN THE DRAIN
And at this point there was some discussion of steel and particularly automobiles. I remember him saying that automobiles would be imported from Japan on an equal footing with our own domestically produced automobiles, but the Japanese product would be better. Things would be made so they would break and fall apart – that is, in the United States – so that people would tend to prefer the imported variety and this would give a bit of a boost to foreign competitors. One example, was Japanese. In 1969, Japanese automobiles – if they were sold here at all, I don’t remember – but they certainly weren’t very popular.
But the idea was, you could get a little bit disgusted with your Ford, GM, or Chrysler product – or whatever – because little things like window handles would fall off more, and plastic parts would break which, had they been made of metal, would hold up. Your patriotism about buying American would soon give way to practicality that if you bought Japanese, German, or imported that it would last longer and you would be better off. Patriotism would go down the drain then.
It was mentioned elsewhere, things being made to fall apart too. I don’t remember specific items or if they were even stated other than automobiles, but I do recall of having the impression, sort of in my imagination, of a surgeon having something fall apart in his hands in the operating room, at a critical time. Was he including this sort of thing in his discussion? But somewhere in this discussion about things being made deliberately defective and unreliable not only was to tear down patriotism but to be just a little source of irritation to people who would use such things.
Note: People have to go to court having flags on their homes. Kids being sent home for having a flag on their shirt! This is going on everywhere now. Trump being called a “Nationalist” as if was a bad word!
LOSS OF JOBS — LOSS OF SECURITY
Again, the idea that you not feel terribly secure, promoting the notion that the world isn’t a terribly reliable place. The United States was to be kept strong in information, communications, high technology, education and agriculture. The United States was seen as continuing to be sort of the keystone of this global system. But heavy industry would be transported out. One of the comments made about heavy industry was that we had had enough environmental damage from smokestacks and industrial waste and some of the other people could put up with that for a while. This again, was supposed to be a “redeeming quality” for Americans to accept. You took away our industry but you saved our environment. So we really didn’t lose on it.
[ASIDE] POPULATION SHIFTS TO ELIMINATE “TRADITIONS”
And along this line there were talks about people losing their jobs as a result of industry and opportunities for retraining, and particularly population shifts would be brought about. This is sort of an aside. I think I’ll explore the aside before I forget it. Population shifts were to be brought about so that people would be tending to move into the Sun Belt. They would be, sort of, people without roots in their new locations, and traditions are easier to change in a place where there are a lot of transplanted people, as compared to trying to changing traditions in a place where people grew up and had an extended family – where they had roots. Things like new medical care systems. If you pick up from a Northeast industrial city and you transplant yourself to the South Sun Belt or Southwest, you’ll be more accepting of whatever kind of, for example, controlled medical care you find there than you would accept a change in the medical care system where you had roots and the support of your family. Also in this vein it was mentioned – he used the plural personal pronoun “we” – we take control first of the port cities… New York, San Francisco, Seattle… the idea being that this is a piece of strategy. The idea being that if you control the port cities with your philosophy and your way of life, the HEARTLAND in between has to yield.
I can’t elaborate more on that but it is interesting, if you look around the most liberal areas of the country – and progressively so – are the seacoast cities; the heartland, the Midwest, does seem to have maintained its conservatism. But as you take away industry and jobs and relocate people then this is a strategy to break down conservatism. When you take away industry, and people are unemployed and poor they will accept whatever change seems to offer them survival; and their morals and their commitment to things will all give way to survival. That’s not my philosophy. That’s the speaker’s philosophy.
HUNTING
There was some discussion about hunting, not surprisingly. Hunting requires guns and gun control is a big element in these plans. I don’t remember the details much, but the idea is that gun ownership is a privilege and not everybody should have guns. Hunting was an inadequate excuse for owning guns and everybody should be restricted in gun ownership. The few privileged people who should be allowed to hunt could maybe rent or borrow a gun from official quarters rather than own their own. After all, everybody doesn’t have a need for a gun, is the way it was put.
SPORTS FOR GIRLS — TO DE-EMPHASIZE FEMININITY
Very important in sports was sports for girls. Athletics would be pushed for girls. This was intended to replace dolls. Baby dolls would still be around, a few of them, but you would not see the number and variety of dolls. Dolls would not be pushed because girls should not be thinking about babies and reproduction. Girls should be out on the athletic field just as the boys are. Girls and boys really need not to be all that different. Tea sets were to go the way of dolls, and all these things that traditionally were thought of as feminine would be de-emphasized as girls got into more masculine pursuits.
Just one other thing I recall was that the sports pages would be full of the scores of girls teams just right along there with the boys teams. And that’s recently begun to appear after 20 years in our local papers. The girls sports scores are right along with the boys sports scores. So all of this to change the role model of what young girls should look to be. While she’s growing up she should look to be an athlete rather to look forward to being a mother.
ENTERTAINMENT: VIOLENCE, SEX AND MORE SEX DESENSITIZATION — PREPARING THE PEOPLE FOR “HUMAN CASUALTIES”
Movies would gradually be made more explicit as regards sex and language. After all, sex and rough language are real and why pretend that they are not? There would be pornographic movies in the theaters, on television. And VCR’s were not around at that time, but he had indicated that these cassettes would be available, and video cassette players would be available for use in the home and pornographic movies would be available for use on these VCRs as well as in the neighborhood theater and on your television. He said something like, “You’ll see people in the movies doing everything you can think of.”
He went on to say that… and all of this is intended to bring sex out in the open. That was another comment that was made several times – the term “sex out in the open.” Violence would be made more graphic. This was intended to desensitize people to violence. There might need to be a time when people would witness real violence and be a part of it. Later on it will become clear where this is headed. So there would be more realistic violence in entertainment which would make it easier for people to adjust.
People’s attitudes towards death would change and they would not be so fearful of it but more accepting of it, and not be so aghast at the sight of dead people or injured people. We don’t need to have a genteel population paralyzed by what they might see. People would just learn to say, “well, I don’t want that to happen to me.”
This was the first statement suggesting that the plan includes numerous human casualties which the survivors would see. This particular aspect of the presentation came back in my memory very sharply a few years later when a movie about the Lone Ranger came out and I took my very young son to see it and early in the movie were some very violent scenes. One of the victims was shot in the forehead and there was sort of a splat where the bullet entered his forehead and blood and I remember regretting that I took my son, and remember feeling anger toward the doctor who spoke. Not that he made the movie, but he agreed to be part of this movement, and I was repelled by the movie and it brought back this aspect of his presentation very sharply in my memory.
GIVE US THE YOUNG
And again, he was right. This aspect was sort of summarized with the notion that entertainment would be a tool to influence young people. It won’t change the older people, they are already set in their ways, but the changes would be all aimed at the young, who are in their formative years, and the older generation would be passing. Not only could you not change them, but they are relatively unimportant, anyhow. Once they live out their lives and are gone, the younger generation being formed, are the ones that would be important for the future in the 21st century.
He also indicated all the old movies would be brought back again, and I remember on hearing that through my mind ran quickly the memories of a number of old movies. I wondered if they would be included, the ones that I thought I would like to see again.
Along with bringing back old music and old movies for older people there were other privileges that would also be accorded older folks: free transportation, breaks on purchases, discounts, tax discounts – a number of privileges just because they were older. This was stated to be sort of a reward for the generation which had grown up through the depression and had survived the rigors of World War II. They had deserved it, and they were going to be rewarded with all these goodies, and the bringing back of the good old music and the good old movies was going to help ease them through their final years in comfort.
Note: They are going after home schoolers now more and more. Government officials have come out saying such as the woman that recently said ”We have to get away from this idea that children belong to parents…they belong to the community”
’80s AND ’90s — THE GRIM REAPER. TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS — NATIONAL ID — THE CHIP, ETC.
Then, the presentation began to get rather grim, because once that generation passed, and that would be in the late 80′s and early 90′s where we are now, most of that [age] group would be gone and then, gradually, things would tighten up and the tightening up would be accelerated. The old movies and old songs would be withdrawn; the gentler entertainment would be withdrawn. Travel, instead of being easy for old folks… travel then would become very restricted. People would need permission to travel and they would need a good reason to travel. If you didn’t have a good reason for your travel you would not be allowed to travel, and everyone would need ID.
This would at first be an ID card you would carry on your person and you must show when you are asked for it. It was already planned that later on some sort of device would be developed to be implanted under the skin that would be coded specifically to identify the individual. This would eliminate the possibility of false ID and also eliminate the possibility of people saying, “Well, I lost my ID.”
The difficulty about these skin-implanted ID was stated to be getting material that would stay in or under the skin without causing foreign body reaction whereby the body would reject it or cause infection, and that this would have to be material on which information could be recorded and retrieved by some sort of scanner while it was not rejected by the body.
Silicon was mentioned. Silicon at that time was thought to be well tolerated. It was used to augment breasts. Women who felt their breasts were too small would get silicon implants, and this still goes on. At any rate silicon was seen at that time as the promising material to do both… to be retained in the body without rejection and to be able to retain information retrievable by electronic means.
FOOD CONTROL
Food supplies would come under tight control. If population growth didn’t slow down, food shortages could be created in a hurry and people would realize the dangers of overpopulation. Ultimately, whether the population slows down or not the food supply is to be brought under centralized control so that people would have enough to be well-nourished but they would not have enough to support any fugitive from the new system. In other words, if you had a friend or relative who didn’t sign on [side one ends abruptly continue on side two]
And growing ones own food would be outlawed. This would be done under some sort of pretext. In the beginning, I mentioned there were two purposes for everything – one the ostensible purpose and one the real purpose – and the ostensible purpose here would be that growing your own vegetables was unsafe, it would spread disease or something like that. So the acceptable idea was to protect the consumer but the real idea was to limit the food supply and growing your own food would be illegal.
Note: People have been arrested and taken to court over growing their own food! Farmers have been arrested for selling raw milk which is the only milk that is good for you. Farmers arrested for raising hogs outside or taken to court because Monsanto seeds blew into their fields!
And if you persist in illegal activities like growing your own food, then you’re a criminal.
WEATHER CONTROL
There was a mention then of weather. This was another really striking statement. He said, “We can or soon will be able to control the weather.”
He said, “I’m not merely referring to dropping iodide crystals into the clouds to precipitate rain that’s already there, but REAL control.” And weather was seen as a weapon of war, a weapon of influencing public policy. It could make rain or withhold rain in order to influence certain areas and bring them under your control. There were two sides to this that were rather striking.
He said, “On the one hand you can make drought during the growing season so that nothing will grow, and on the other hand you can make for very heavy rains during harvest season so the fields are too muddy to bring in the harvest, and indeed one might be able to do both.”
There was no statement how this would be done. It was stated that either it was already possible or very very close to being possible.
Note: We know through the work of Jesse Ventura and many others that HAARP is a worldwide system that was made to control the weather. During the lecture, Dr. Day they already controlled the weather in 1969!
POLITICS
Politics. He said that very few people really know how government works. Something to the effect that elected officials are influenced in ways that they don’t even realize, and they carry out plans that have been made for them, and they think that they are authors of the plans. But actually they are manipulated in ways they don’t understand.
Note: Hillary Clinton said one time that the CFR (Council of Foreign Relations) which is a NWO organization was where they told them what to do!
KNOW HOW PEOPLE RESPOND — MAKING THEM DO WHAT YOU WANT
Somewhere in the presentation he made two statements that I want to insert at this time. I don’t remember just where they were made, but they’re valid in terms of the general overall view. One statement : “People can carry in their minds and act upon two contradictory ideas at one time, provided that these two contradictory ideas are kept far enough apart.”
And the other statement is, “You can know pretty well how rational people are going to respond to certain circumstances or to certain information that they encounter. So, to determine the response you want, you need only control the kind of data or information that they’re presented or the kinds of circumstance that they’re in; and being rational people they’ll do what you want them to do. They may not fully understand what they’re doing or why.”
FALSIFIED SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
Somewhere in this connection, then, was the statement admitting that some scientific research data could be – and indeed HAS been – falsified in order to bring about desired results. And here was said, “People don’t ask the right questions. Some people are too trusting.”
Now this was an interesting statement because the speaker and the audience all being doctors of medicine and supposedly very objectively, dispassionately scientific and science being the be all and end-all… well to falsify scientific research data in that setting is like blasphemy in the church… you just don’t do that. Anyhow, out of all of this was to come the New International Governing Body, probably to come through the UN and with a World Court, but not necessarily through those structures. It could be brought about in other ways.
Note: Global Warming research has already been exposed as fraudulent. All designed to bring in carbon taxes and shut down cheap power for the people. And of course we all know that free energy has been completely suppressed and websites controlled by the NWO such as Wikipedia say it’s “impossible”. I have all kinds of examples of free energy on www.project.nsearch.com
ACCEPTANCE OF THE U.N. — THE END JUSTIFIES THE MEANS
Acceptance of the U.N. at that time was seen as not being as wide as was hoped. Efforts would continue to give the United Nations increasing importance. People would be more and more used to the idea of relinquishing some national sovereignty. Economic interdependence would foster this goal from a peaceful standpoint.
Avoidance of war would foster it from the standpoint of worrying about hostilities. It was recognized that doing it peaceably was better than doing it by war. It was stated at this point that war was “obsolete.” I thought that was an interesting phrase because obsolete means something that once was seen as useful is no longer useful. But war is obsolete… this being because of the nuclear bombs war is no longer controllable.
Formerly, wars could be controlled, but if nuclear weapons would fall into the wrong hands there could be an unintended nuclear disaster. It was not stated who the “wrong hands” are. We were free to infer that maybe this meant terrorists, but in more recent years I’m wondering whether the wrong hands might also include people that we’ve assumed that they’ve had nuclear weapons all along… maybe they don’t have them.
Just as it was stated that industry would be preserved in the United States – a little bit, just in case the world wide plans didn’t work out; just in case some country or some other powerful person decided to bolt from the pack and go his own way – one wonders whether this might also be true with nuclear weapons. When you hear that… he said they might fall into the wrong hands, there was some statement that the possession of nuclear weapons had been tightly controlled, sort of implying that anybody who had nuclear weapons was intended to have them. That would necessarily have included the Soviet Union, if indeed they have them.
But I recall wondering at the time, “Are you telling us, or are you implying that this country willingly gave weapons to the Soviets?”. At that time that seemed like a terribly unthinkable thing to do, much less to admit. The leaders of the Soviet Union seem to be so dependent on the West though, one wonders whether there may have been some fear that they would try to assert independence if they indeed had these weapons. So, I don’t know. It’s something to speculate about perhaps… Who did he mean when he said, “If these weapons fall into the wrong hands”? Maybe just terrorists.
Anyhow, the new system would be brought in, if not by peaceful cooperation – everybody willingly yielding national sovereignty – then by bringing the nation to the brink of nuclear war. And everybody would be so fearful as hysteria is created by the possibility of nuclear war that there would be a strong public outcry to negotiate a public peace and people would willingly give up national sovereignty in order to achieve peace, and thereby this would bring in the New International Political System.
This was stated and very impressive thing to hear then… “If there were too many people in the right places who resisted this, there might be a need to use one or two – possibly more – nuclear weapons. As it was put this would be possibly needed to convince people that “We mean business”.
That was followed by the statement that, “By the time one or two of those went off then everybody – even the most reluctant – would yield.”
He said something about “this negotiated peace would be very convincing,” as kind of in a framework or in a context that the whole thing was rehearsed but nobody would know it. People hearing about it would be convinced that it was a genuine negotiation between hostile enemies who finally had come to the realization that peace was better than war.
WAR IS GOOD — YOU GET TO BE CANNON-FODDER, KEEP THE POPULATION DOWN, AND DIE A HERO
In this context discussing war, and war is obsolete, a statement was made that there were some good things about war… one, you’re going to die anyway, and people sometimes in war get a chance to display great courage and heroism and if they die they’ve died well and if they survive they get recognition. So that in any case, the hardships of war on soldiers are worth it because that’s the reward they get out of their warring.
Another justification expressed for war was, if you think of the many millions of casualties in WWI and WWII, well… suppose all those people had not died but had continued to live, then continued to have babies. There would be millions upon millions and we would already be overpopulated, so those two great wars served a benign purpose in delaying over-population. But now there are technological means for the individual and governments to control over-population so in this regard war is obsolete. It’s no longer needed. And then again, it’s obsolete because nuclear weapons could destroy the whole universe. War, which once was controllable, could get out of control and so for these two reasons it’s now obsolete.
TERRORISM — THE GREAT TOOL FOR ‘CONTROL’
There was a discussion of terrorism. Terrorism would be used widely in Europe and in other parts of the world. Terrorism at that time was thought would not be necessary in the United States. It could become necessary in the United States if the United States did not move rapidly enough into accepting the system. But at least in the foreseeable future it was not planned. And very benignly on their part. Maybe terrorism would not be required here, but the implication being that it would be indeed used if it was necessary.
Along with this came a bit of a scolding that Americans had had it too good anyway and just a little bit of terrorism would help convince Americans that the world is indeed a dangerous place… or can be if we don’t relinquish control to the proper authorities.
Note: It’s now a fact that the US created Alqaeda and the Israelis created Hamas. It’s a big game to pump up the fear and give excuses to start wars.
MONEY AND BANKING
There was discussion of money and banking. One statement was , “Inflation is infinite. You can put an infinite number of zeros after any number and put the decimals points wherever you want” , as an indication that inflation is a TOOL of the controllers.
Money would become predominately credit. It was already… money is primarily a credit thing, but exchange of money would be not cash or palpable things but electronic credit signal. People would carry money only in very small amounts for things like chewing gum and candy bars. Just pocket sorts of things. Any purchase of any significant amount would be done electronically. Earnings would be electronically entered into your account.
It would be a single banking system. [It] may have the appearance of being more than one but ultimately and basically it would be one single banking system, so that when you got paid your pay would be entered for you into your account balance and then when you purchased anything at the point of purchase it would be deducted from your account balance and you would actually carry nothing with you.
Also computer records can be kept on whatever it was you purchased so that if you were purchasing too much of any particular item and some official wanted to know what you were doing with your money they could go back and review your purchases and determine what you were buying.
There was a statement that any purchase of significant size like an automobile, bicycle, a refrigerator, a radio or television or whatever might have some sort of identification on it so it could be traced, so that very quickly anything which was either given away or stolen – whatever – authorities would be able to establish who purchased it and when.
Computers would allow this to happen. The ability to save would be greatly curtailed. People would just not be able to save any considerable degree of wealth. There was some statement of recognition that wealth represents power, and wealth in the hands of a lot of people is not good for the people in charge, so if you save too much you might be taxed. The more you save the higher rate of tax on your savings so your savings really could never get very far. And also if you began to show a pattern of saving too much, you might have your pay cut. We would say , “Well, you’re saving instead of spending. You really don’t need all that money.”
That basically the idea being to prevent people from accumulating any wealth which might have long range disruptive influence on the system. People would be encouraged to use credit to borrow, and then also be encouraged to renege on their debt, so they would destroy their own credit. The idea here is that, again, if you’re too stupid to handle credit wisely, this gives the authorities the opportunity to come down hard on you once you’ve shot your credit.
Electronic payments initially would all be based on different kinds of credit cards… these were already in use in 1969 to some extent. Not as much as now. But people would have credit cards with the electronic strip on it and once they got used to that then it would be pointed out the advantage of having all of that combined into a single credit card, serving a single monetary system and then they won’t have to carry around all that plastic.
So the next step would be the single card and then the next step would be to replace the single card with a skin implant. The single card could be lost or stole, give rise to problems; could be exchanged with somebody else to confuse identify. The skin implant on the other hand would be not loseable or counterfeitable or transferrable to another person so you and your accounts would be identified without any possibility of error. And the skin implants would have to be put some place that would be convenient to the skin; for example your right hand or your forehead.
At that time when I heard this I was unfamiliar with the statements in the Book of Revelation. The speaker went on to say, “Now some of you people who read the Bible will attach significance to this to the Bible,” but he went on to disclaim any Biblical significance at all. This is just common sense of how the system could work and should work and there’s no need to read any superstitious Biblical principals into it. As I say, at the time I was not very familiar with the words of Revelations. Shortly after, I became familiar with it and the significance of what he said really was striking. I’ll never forget it.
BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, WHILE YOU’RE WATCHING TV
There was some mention, also, of implants that would lend themselves to surveillance by providing radio signals. This could be under the skin or a dental implant… put in like a filling so that either fugitives or possibly other citizens could be identified by a certain frequency from his personal transmitter and could be located at any time or any place by any authority who wanted to find him. This would be particularly useful for somebody who broke out of prison.
There was more discussion of personal surveillance. One more thing was said, “You’ll be watching television and somebody will be watching you at the same time at a central monitoring station.”
Television sets would have a device to enable this. The TV set would not have to be on in order for this to be operative. Also, the television set can be used to monitor what you are watching. People can tell what you’re watching on TV and how you’re reacting to what you’re watching. And you would not know that you were being watched while you were watching your television.
How would we get people to accept these things into their homes? Well, people would buy them when they buy their own television. They won’t know that they’re on there at first. This was described by being what we now know as Cable TV to replace the antenna TV. When you buy a TV set this monitor would just be part of the set and most people would not have enough knowledge to know it was there in the beginning. And then the cable would be the means of carrying the surveillance message to the monitor. By the time people found out that this monitoring was going on, they would also be very dependent upon television for a number of things. Just the way people are dependent upon the telephone today.
One thing the television would be used for would be purchases. You wouldn’t have to leave your home to purchase. You just turn on your TV and there would be a way of interacting with your television channel to the store that you wanted to purchase. And you could flip the switch from place to place to choose a refrigerator or clothing. This would be both convenient, but it would also make you dependent on your television so the built-in monitor would be something you could not do without. There was some discussion of audio monitors, too, just in case the authorities wanted to hear what was going on in rooms other than where the television monitor was, and in regard to this the statement was made, “Any wire that went into your house, for example your telephone wire, could be used this way.”
I remember this in particular because it was fairly near the end of the presentation and as we were leaving the meeting place, I said something to one of my colleagues about going home and pulling all of the wires out of my house… except I knew I couldn’t get by without the telephone. And the colleague I spoke to just seemed numb. To this day, I don’t think he even remembers what we talked about or what we heard that time, cause I’ve asked him. But at that time he seemed stunned.
Before all these changes would take place with electronic monitoring, it was mentioned that there would be service trucks all over the place, working on the wires and putting in new cables. This is how people who were on the inside would know how things were progressing.
Note: They even have the TV show, “Big Brother” where they make stars of people living in a house loaded up with cameras and microphones. People that run Google say you shouldn’t worry about being monitored unless you are doing somethign wrong. And of course now it’s come out that the NSA is monitoring every email, every phone call, every fax, capturing vidoe from web cams etc. I have no doubts that even since the 70s that every TV has a hidden camera and microphone in it.
PRIVATELY OWNED HOMES — “A THING OF THE PAST”
Privately owned housing would become a thing of the past. The cost of housing and financing housing would gradually be made so high that most people couldn’t afford it. People who already owned their houses would be allowed to keep them but as years go by it would be more and more difficult for young people to buy a house. Young people would more and more become renters, particularly in apartments or condominiums. More and more unsold houses would stand vacant. People just couldn’t buy them. But the cost of housing would not come down.
You’d right away think, well the vacant house, the price would come down, the people would buy it. But there was some statement to the effect that the price would be held high even though there were many available so that free market places would not operate. People would not be able to buy these and gradually more and more of the population would be forced into small apartments… small apartments which would not accommodate very many children. Then as the number of real home-owners diminished they would become a minority.
There would be no sympathy for them from the majority who dwelled in the apartments and then these homes could be taken by increased taxes or other regulations that would be detrimental to home ownership and would be acceptable to the majority. Ultimately, people would be assigned where they would live and it would be common to have non-family members living with you. This by way of your not knowing just how far you could trust anybody. This would all be under the control of a central housing authority. Have this in mind in 1990 when they ask , “How many bedrooms in your house? How many bathrooms in your house? Do you have a finished game room?” .
This information is personal and is of no national interest to government under our existing Constitution. But you’ll be asked those questions and decide how you want to respond to them.
When the new system takes over people will be expected to sign allegiance to it, indicating that they don’t have any reservations or holding back to the old system. “There just won’t be any room “, he said, “ for people who won’t go along. We can’t have such people cluttering up the place so such people would be taken to special places,”
And here I don’t remember the exact words, but the inference I drew was that at these special places where they were taken, then they would not live very long. He may have said something like, “disposed of humanely”, but I don’t remember very precisely… just the impression the system was not going to support them when they would not go along with the system. That would leave death as the only alternative.
Somewhere in this vein he said there would not be any martyrs. When I first heard this I thought it meant the people would not be killed, but as the presentation developed what he meant was they would not be killed in such a way or disposed of in such a way that they could serve as inspiration to other people the way martyrs do. Rather he said something like this. “People will just disappear.”
Note: This has already come true. Very few young people can afford to get homes. All the empty homes are kept off the mark so that nobody can get a good price with the increased supply. Many people report the homeless are just being disposed of quietly. They’re just gone one day!
A FEW FINAL ITEMS…
Just a few additional items sort of thrown in here in the end which I failed to include where they belong more perfectly.
One: The bringing in of the new system he said probably would occur on a weekend in the winter. Everything would shut down on Friday evening and Monday morning, when everybody wakened, there would be an announcement that the New System was in place. During the process in getting the United States ready for these changes everybody would be busier with less leisure time and less opportunity to really look about and see what was going on around them.
Also, there would be more changes and more difficulty in keeping up as far as one’s investments. Investment instruments would be changing. Interest rates would be changing so that it would be a difficult job with keeping up with what you had already earned.
Interesting about automobiles; it would look as though there were many varieties of automobiles, but when you look very closely there would be great duplication. They would be made to look different with chrome and wheel covers and this sort of thing, but looking closely one would see that the same automobile was made by more than one manufacturer.
This recently was brought down to me when I was in a parking lot and saw a small Ford – I forget the model – and a small Japanese automobile which were identical except for a number of things like the number of holes in the wheel cover and the chrome around the plate and the shape of the grill. But if you looked at the basic parts of the automobile, they were identical. They just happened to be parked side-by-side, where I was struck with this, and I was again reminded of what had been said many years ago.
I’m hurrying here because I’m just about to the end of the tape. Let me just summarize here by saying, all of these things said by one individual at one time in one place relating to so many different human endeavors and then to look and see how many of these actually came about… that is, changes accomplished between then and now [1969 – 1988] and the things which are planned for the future, I think there is no denying that this is controlled and there is indeed a conspiracy.
The question then becomes what to do. I think first off, WE MUST PUT OUR FAITH IN GOD and PRAY and ASK FOR HIS GUIDANCE. And secondly, do what we can to inform other individuals as much as possible, as much as they may be interested.
SOME PEOPLE JUST DON’T CARE, because they’re preoccupied with getting along in their own personal endeavors. But, as much as possible, I think we should try to inform other people who may be interested, and again…
PUT OUR FAITH AND TRUST IN GOD AND PRAY CONSTANTLY FOR HIS GUIDANCE AND FOR THE COURAGE TO ACCEPT WHAT WE MAY BE FACING IN THE NEAR FUTURE. Rather than accept PEACE and JUSTICE which we hear so much now… it’s a cliche. LET’S INSIST ON LIBERTY AND JUSTICE FOR ALL.
For healing in the name of Jesus
http://www.jesushealingnow.com